Population-Specific

Adaptation Articles

 

Infant Studies

Infant Language Production and Parenting Skills: A Randomized Controlled Trial (abstract)

Garcia, D., Rodriquez, G. M., Hill, R. M., Lorenzo, N. E., & Bagner, D. M. (2019).

Behavioral Parent Training in Infancy: What About the Parent–Infant Relationship? (abstract)

Blizzard, A. M., Barroso, N. E., Ramos, F. G., Graziano, P. A., & Bagner, D. M. (2018).

Response-based sleep intervention: Helping infants sleep without making them cry (abstract)

Middlemiss, W., Stevens, H., Ridgway, L., McDonald, S., & Koussa, M. (2017).

Behavioral parent training in infancy: What about the parent-infant relationship? (abstract)

Blizzard, A. M., Barroso, N. E., Ramos, F. G., Graziano, P. A., & Bagner, D. M. (2017)

Behavioral parent training in infancy: A window of opportunity for high-risk families (abstract)

Bagner, D. M., Coxe, S., Hungerford, G. M., Garcia, D., Barroso, N. E., Hernandez, J., & Rosa-Olivares, J. (2016)

Direct and indirect effects of behavioral parent training on infant language production (abstract)

Bagner, D. M., Garcia, D., & Hill, R. (2016)

Home-based preventive parenting intervention for at-risk infants and their families: An open trial (abstract)

Bagner, D. M., Rodríguez, G. M., Blake, C. A., & Rosa-Olivares, J. (2013) 

 

Toddler Studies

Impact of a Brief Group Intervention to Enhance Parenting and the Home Learning Environment for Children Aged 6-36 Months: a Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial (abstract)

Hackworth, N., Berthelsen, D., Matthews, J., Westrupp, E., Cann, W., Ukoumunne, O., Bennetts, S., Phan, T., Scicluna, A., Trajanovska, M., Yu, M., Nicholson, J., Hackworth, N. J., Westrupp, E. M., Ukoumunne, O. C., Bennetts, S. K., & Nicholson, J. M. (2017).

Parenting styles, feeding styles and food-related parenting practices in relation to toddlers’ eating styles: A cluster-analytic approach (abstract)

Van der Horst, K., & Sleddens, E. F. C. (2017).

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for toddlers: A pilot study (abstract)

Kohlhoff, J., & Morgan, S. (2014)

Parent-Child Attunement Therapy for toddlers: A behaviorally oriented, play-based parent training model (abstract)

Dombrowski, S. C., Timmer, S. G., & Zebell, N. (2008)

A positive behavioural intervention for toddlers: Parent-Child Attunement Therapy (abstract)

Dombrowski, S. C., Timmer, S. G., Blacker, D. M., & Urquiza, A. J. (2005)

 

Physical and Medical Conditions

Development of the Impact of a Preschool Obesity Prevention Intervention Enhanced With Positive Behavioral Supports for Mississippi Head Start Centers. (abstract)

Huye, H. F., Connell, C. L., Dufrene, B. A., Mohn, R. S., Newkirk, C., Tannehill, J., & Sutton, V. (2020). 

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy as a Behavior and Spoken Language Intervention for Young Children With Hearing Loss. (abstract)

Costa, E. A., Day, L., Caverly, C., Mellon, N., Ouellette, M., & Ottley, S. W. (2019). 

NP31 Development of the Family Meal Project: A Family Nutrition Ecosystem Intervention to Prevent Childhood Overweight/Obesity (abstract)

Frazier, S., Campa, A., & Coccia, C. (2019).

Efficacy of parent-child interaction therapy on anxiety symptoms in cochlear implanted deaf children. (abstract)

Javadi, N., Keshavarzi, A. F., & Hasanzadeh, S. (2018).

Adapting Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for deaf families that communicate via American Sign Language: A formal adaptation approach (abstract)

Day, L. A., Costa, E. A., Previ, D., & Caverly, C. (2017)

Assessing the effectiveness of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with language delayed children: A clinical investigation (abstract)

Falkus, G., Tilley, C., Thomas, C., Hockey, H., Kennedy, A., Arnold, T., Thorburn, B., Jones, K., Patel, B., Piments, C., Shah, R., Tweedie, F., O'Brien, F., Leahy, R., & Pring, T. (2016) 

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy and moderate pediatric traumatic brain injury: A case study (abstract)

Garcia, D., Barroso, N. E., Kuluz, J., & Bagner, D. M. (2016)

The practical side of working with Parent–Child Interaction Therapy with preschool children with language impairments (abstract)

Klatte, L.S., & Roulstone, S. (2016)

Combining Parent–Child Interaction Therapy and visual supports for the treatment of challenging behavior in a child with autism and intellectual disabilities and comorbid epilepsy (abstract)

Armstrong, K., DeLoatche, K. J., Preece, K. K. & Agazzi, H. (2015)

Language production in children with and at risk for delay: Mediating role of parenting skills (abstract)

Garcia, D., Bagner, D. M., Pruden, S. M., & Nichols-Lopez, K. (2015)

Parent–Child Interaction Therapy with deaf parents and their hearing child: A case study (abstract)

Armstrong, K., David, A., & Goldberg, K. (2014)

Parent training for children born premature: A pilot study examining the moderating role of emotion regulation (abstract)

Rodríguez, G. M., Bagner, D. M., & Graziano, P. A. (2014)

Evidence-based intervention for young children born premature: Preliminary evidence for associated changes in physiological regulation (abstract)

Graziano, P. A., Bagner, D. M., Sheinkopf, S. J., Vohr, B. R., & Lester, B. M. (2013)

Parent–Child Interaction Therapy with a deaf and hard of hearing family (abstract)

Shinn, M. M. (2013)

An initial investigation of baseline respiratory sinus arrhythmia as a moderator of treatment outcome for young children born premature with externalizing behavior problems (abstract)

Bagner, D. M., Graziano, P. A., Jaccard, J., Sheinkopf, S. J., Vohr, B. R., & Lester, B. M. (2012)

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy as a family-oriented approach to behavioral management following psychiatric traumatic brain injury: A case report. (abstract)

Cohen, M. L., Heaton, S. C., Ginn, N., & Eyberg, S. M. (2012)

Klinefelter's syndrome in a 5-year-old boy with behavioral disturbances and seizures (abstract)

Jensen, E., Palacios, E., & Drury, S. (2011)

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) in school-aged children with specific language impairment (abstract)

Allen, J., & Marshall, C. R. (2011)

Parenting intervention for externalizing behavior problems in children born premature: An initial examination (abstract)

Bagner, D. M., Sheinkopf, S. J., Vohr, B. R., & Lester, B. M. (2010)

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for children born premature: A case study and illustration of vagal tones as a physiological measure of treatment outcome (abstract)

Bagner, D. M., Sheinkopf, S. J., Miller-Loncar, C. L., Vohr, B. R., Hinckley, M., Eyberg, S. M., & Lester, B. M. (2009)

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy and chronic illness: A case study (abstract)   

Bagner, D. M., Fernandez, M. A., & Eyberg, S. M. (2004)

Parent-Child Interaction Training for parents with a history of mental retardation (abstract)

Peterson, S. L., Robinson, E. A., & Littman, I. (1983)

 

Teacher-Child Interaction Training (TCIT) &

School-Related Research Articles

Universal TCIT Improves Teacher–Child Interactions and Management of Child Behavior. (abstract)

Fawley, K. D., Stokes, T. F., Rainear, C. A., Rossi, J. L., & Budd, K. S. (2020).

Collaborating with public school partners to implement Teacher-Child Interaction Training (TCIT) as universal prevention (abstract)

Budd, K. S., Barbacz, L. L., & Carter, J. S. (2015)

From the clinics to the classrooms: A review of Teacher-Child Interaction Training in primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention settings (abstract)

Fernandez, M. A., Gold, D. C., Hirsch, E., & Miller, S. P. (2015)

Teacher-Child Interaction Training: A pilot study with random assignment (abstract)

Fernandez, M. A. (2015)

Promoting positive interactions in the classroom: Adapting Parent-Child Interaction Therapy as a universal prevention program (abstract)

Gershenson, R. A., Lyon, A. R., & Budd, K. S. (2010)

Effectiveness of Teacher-Child Interaction Training (TCIT) in a preschool setting (abstract)

Lyon, A. R., Gershenson, R. A., Farahmand, F. K., Thaxter, P. J., Behling, S., & Budd, K. S. (2009)

Managing classroom behavior of Head Start children using response cost and token economy procedures (abstract)

Tiano, J. D., Fortson, B. L., McNeil, C. B., & Humphreys, L. A. (2005)

Training Head Start teachers in behavior management using Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: A preliminary investigation (abstract)

Tiano, J.D., & McNeil, C.B. (2005)

Psychometric properties of the Sutter-Eyberg Student Behavior Inventory with rural middle school and high school children (abstract)

Floyd, E. M., Rayfield, A., Eyberg, S. M., & Riley, J. L. (2004)

The use of token economies in preschool classrooms: Practical and philosophical concerns (abstract)

Filcheck, H. A., & McNeil, C. B. (2004)

Using a whole-class token economy and coaching of teacher skills in a preschool classroom to manage disruptive behavior (abstract)

Filcheck, H. A., McNeil, C. B., Greco, L. A., & Bernard, R. S. (2004)

Psychometric properties of the Sutter-Eyberg Student Behavior Inventory-Revised with preschool children (abstract)

Querido, J. G., & Eyberg, S. M. (2003)

Psychometric properties and reference point data for the Revised Edition of the School Observation Coding System (abstract)

Jacobs, J. R., Boggs, S. R., Eyberg, S. M., Edwards, D., Durning, P., Querido, J. G., McNeil, C. B., & Funderburk, B. W. (2000)

Parent-child interaction therapy with behavior problem children: Maintenance of treatment effects in the school setting (abstract)

Funderburk, B. W., Eyberg, S. M., Newcomb, K., McNeil, C., Hembree-Kigin, T., & Capage, L. (1998)

Revision of the Sutter-Eyberg Student Behavior Inventory: Teacher ratings of conduct problem behavior (abstract)

Rayfield, A., Eyberg, S. M., & Foote, R. (1998)

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with behavior problem children: Generalization of treatment effects to the school setting (abstract)

Funderburk, B., Newcomb, K., McNeil, C. B., Eyberg, S., & Eisenstadt, T. H. (1991)

Further psychometric evaluation of the Eyberg Behavior Rating scales for parents and teachers of preschoolers (abstract)

Funderburk, B. W., & Eyberg, S. M. (1989)

Psychometric characteristics of the Sutter-Eyberg Student Behavior Inventor: A school behavior rating scale for use with preschool children (abstract)

Funderburk, B. W., & Eyberg, S. M. (1989)

 

Military Families

Kids at the VA? A call for evidence-based parenting interventions for returning veterans (abstract)

Pemberton, J. R., Kramer, T. L., Borrego, J., & Owen, R. R. (2013)

Infant Language Production and Parenting Skills: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Garcia, D., Rodriquez, G. M., Hill, R. M., Lorenzo, N. E., & Bagner, D. M. (2019). Infant Language Production and Parenting Skills: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Behavior Therapy, 50(3), 544–557. 10.1016/j.beth.2018.09.003

 

Abstract: The current study examined the indirect effect of the use of behavioral parenting skills following the Infant Behavior Program, a brief, home-based adaptation of the child-directed interaction phase of parent-child interaction therapy, on infant language production. Participants were 60 infants (55% male, mean age 13.47 ± 1.31 months) and their caregivers, who were recruited at a large urban pediatric primary care clinic and were included if their scores exceeded the 75th percentile on a brief screener of early behavior problems. Families were randomly assigned to receive the infant behavior program or standard pediatric primary care. Results demonstrated a significant indirect effect of caregivers' use of positive parenting skills (i.e., praise, reflections, and behavior descriptions) on the relation between group and infant total utterances at the 6-month follow-up, such that infants whose caregivers increased their use of positive parenting skills following the intervention showed greater increases in language production. These findings extend previous research examining parenting skills as a mechanism of change in infant language production, and highlight the potential for an early parenting intervention to target behavior and language simultaneously during a critical period in language development.

Keywords: Behavior problems; Infancy; Language production; Parent–child interaction therapy; Parenting skills.

Article: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31030872/

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Behavioral Parent Training in Infancy: What About the Parent-Infant Relationship?

Blizzard, A. M., Barroso, N. E., Ramos, F. G., Graziano, P. A., & Bagner, D. M. (2018). Behavioral Parent Training in Infancy: What About the Parent-Infant Relationship? Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 47, S341–S353. 10.1080/15374416.2017.1310045

 

Abstract: Behavioral parent training (BPT) and attachment interventions have demonstrated efficacy in improving outcomes for young children. Despite theoretical overlap in these approaches, the literature has evolved separately, particularly with respect to outcome measurement in BPT. We examined the impact of the Infant Behavior Program (IBP), a brief home-based adaptation of Parent–Child Interaction Therapy, on changes in attachment-based caregiving behaviors (sensitivity, warmth, and intrusiveness) at postintervention and 3- and 6-month follow-ups during a videotaped infant-led play. Sixty mother–infant dyads were randomly assigned to receive the IBP (n = 28) or standard care (n = 30). Infants were an average age of 13.52 months and predominately from ethnic or racial minority backgrounds (98%). We used bivariate correlations to examine the association between attachment-based caregiving behaviors and behaviorally based parenting do and don’t skills and structural equation modeling to examine the direct effect of the IBP on attachment-based caregiving behaviors and the indirect effect of behaviorally based parenting skills on the relation between intervention group and attachment-based caregiving behaviors. Behaviorally based parenting do and don’t skills were moderately correlated with attachment-based caregiving behaviors. Results demonstrated a direct effect of the IBP on warmth and sensitivity at postintervention and 3- and 6-month follow-ups. The direct effect of the IBP on warmth and sensitivity at the 3- and 6-month follow-ups was mediated by increases in parenting do skills at postintervention. Findings suggest that behaviorally based parenting skills targeted in BPT programs have a broader impact on important attachment-based caregiving behaviors during the critical developmental transition from infancy to toddlerhood.

Keywords: Parenting Stress Index; Parenting education; Parent-child relationships; Attachment behavior;  Developmental psychology.

Article: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5705575/

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Response-based sleep intervention: Helping infants sleep without making them cry

Middlemiss, W., Stevens, H., Ridgway, L., McDonald, S., & Koussa, M. (2017). Response-based sleep intervention: Helping infants sleep without making them cry. Early Human Development, 108, 49–57. 

10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2017.03.008

 

Keywords: Sleep in infants; Infants care; Hydrocortisone; Parent-child interaction therapy; Well-being.

Article: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28426979/

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Behavioral parent training in infancy: What about the parent-infant relationship?

Blizzard, A. M., Barroso, N. E., Ramos, F. G., Graziano, P. A., & Bagner, D. M. (2017). Behavioral parent training in infancy: What about the parent-infant relationship? Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 1-13.  
https://doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2017.1310045

Abstract: Behavioral parent training (BPT) and attachment interventions have demonstrated efficacy in improving outcomes for young children. Despite theoretical overlap in these approaches, the literature has evolved separately, particularly with respect to outcome measurement in BPT. We examined the impact of the Infant Behavior Program (IBP), a brief home-based adaptation of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy, on changes in attachment-based caregiving behaviors (sensitivity, warmth, and intrusiveness) at postintervention and 3- and 6-month follow-ups during a videotaped infant-led play. Sixty mother-infant dyads were randomly assigned to receive the IBP (n = 28) or standard care (n = 30). Infants were an average age of 13.52 months and predominately from ethnic or racial minority backgrounds (98%). We used bivariate correlations to examine the association between attachment-based caregiving behaviors and behaviorally based parenting do and don't skills and structural equation modeling to examine the direct effect of the IBP on attachment-based caregiving behaviors and the indirect effect of behaviorally based parenting skills on the relation between intervention group and attachment-based caregiving behaviors. Behaviorally based parenting do and don't skills were moderately correlated with attachment-based caregiving behaviors. Results demonstrated a direct effect of the IBP on warmth and sensitivity at postintervention and 3- and 6-month follow-ups. The direct effect of the IBP on warmth and sensitivity at the 3- and 6-month follow-ups was mediated by increases in parenting do skills at postintervention. Findings suggest that behaviorally based parenting skills targeted in BPT programs have a broader impact on important attachment-based caregiving behaviors during the critical developmental transition from infancy to toddlerhood.


Keywords: PCIT; Infant Studies. 

Article: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28414546/

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Behavioral parent training in infancy: A window of opportunity for high-risk families

Bagner, D. M., Coxe, S., Hungerford, G. M., Garcia, D., Barroso, N. E., Hernandez, J., & Rosa-Olivares, J. (2016). Behavioral parent training in infancy: A window of opportunity for high-risk families. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 44, 901-912.
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10802-015-0089-5

Abstract: To meet the mental health needs of infants from high-risk families, we examined the effect of a brief home-based adaptation of Parent-child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) on improvements in infant and parent behaviors and reductions in parenting stress. Participants included 60 infants (55 % male; average age of 13.5 ± 1.31 months) who were recruited at a large urban primary care clinic and were included if their scores exceeded the 75th percentile on a brief screener of early behavior problems. Most infants were from an ethnic or racial minority background (98 %) and lived below the poverty line (60 %). Families were randomly assigned to receive the home-based parenting intervention or standard pediatric primary care. Observational and parent-report measures of infant and parenting behaviors were examined at pre- and post-intervention and at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Infants receiving the intervention were more compliant with maternal commands at the 6-month follow-up and displayed lower levels of externalizing and internalizing behavior problems across post and follow-up assessments compared to infants in standard care. Mothers receiving the intervention displayed a significantly higher proportion of positive and lower proportion of negative behaviors with their infant during play compared to mothers in the standard care group. There were no significant group differences for parenting stress. Results provide initial evidence for the efficacy of this brief and home-based adaptation of PCIT for infants. These findings highlight the benefit of identification and intervention as early as possible to promote mental health for infants from high-risk families.


Keywords: PCIT; Infant Studies; Infancy; Behavior Problems; Parent Training; Early Intervention; Risk.

Article: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26446726/

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Direct and indirect effects of behavioral parent training on infant language production

Bagner, D. M., Garcia, D., & Hill, R. (2016). Direct and indirect effects of behavioral parent training on infant language production. Behavior Therapy, 47, 184-197.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.beth.2015.11.001

Abstract: Given the strong association between early behavior problems and language impairment, we examined the effect of a brief home-based adaptation of Parent-child Interaction Therapy on infant language production. Sixty infants (55% male; mean age 13.47±1.31 months) were recruited at a large urban primary care clinic and were included if their scores exceeded the 75th percentile on a brief screener of early behavior problems. Families were randomly assigned to receive the home-based parenting intervention or standard pediatric primary care. The observed number of infant total (i.e., token) and different (i.e., type) utterances spoken during an observation of an infant-led play and a parent-report measure of infant externalizing behavior problems were examined at pre- and post-intervention and at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Infants receiving the intervention demonstrated a significantly higher number of observed different and total utterances at the 6-month follow-up compared to infants in standard care. Furthermore, there was an indirect effect of the intervention on infant language production, such that the intervention led to decreases in infant externalizing behavior problems from pre- to post-intervention, which, in turn, led to increases in infant different utterances at the 3- and 6-month follow-ups and total utterances at the 6-month follow-up. Results provide initial evidence for the effect of this brief and home-based intervention on infant language production, including the indirect effect of the intervention on infant language through improvements in infant behavior, highlighting the importance of targeting behavior problems in early intervention.


Keywords: PCIT; Infant Studies; Language Production; Infancy; Behavior Problems; Parenting; Early Intervention. 

Article: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0005789415001203?via%3Dihub

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Home-Based Preventive Parenting Intervention for at-Risk Infants and Their Families: An Open Trial

Bagner, D., Rodríguez, G.M., Blake, C.A., & Rosa-Olivares, J. (2013). Home-Based Preventive Parenting Intervention for at-Risk Infants and Their Families: An Open Trial. Cognitive and behavioral practice, 20 3, 334-348 .
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpra.2012.08.001

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility, acceptability, and initial outcome of a home-based adaptation of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for at-risk infants with externalizing behavior problems. Seven 12- to 15-month-old infants and their families were recruited at a large pediatric primary care clinic to participate in a home-based parenting intervention to prevent subsequent externalizing behavior problems. Home-based assessments were conducted at baseline, postintervention, and a 4- to 6-month follow-up. Six of the 7 (86%) families completed the intervention, and all completers reported high satisfaction with the intervention. All of the mothers demonstrated significant improvements and statistically reliable changes in their interactions with their infant, and most reported clinically significant and statistically reliable changes in infant behavior problems. The current study provides preliminary support for the use of this brief, home-based parenting intervention in addressing behavior problems as early as possible to improve access to an intervention for at-risk infants and their families. Successes and challenges with the development and implementation of this intervention are discussed along with directions for future research and clinical practice.


Keywords: PCIT,  infancy, externalizing behavior problems, prevention, parenting, risk

Article: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1077722912001010?via%3Dihub

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Impact of a Brief Group Intervention to Enhance Parenting and the Home Learning Environment for Children Aged 6-36 Months: a Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial

Hackworth, N., Berthelsen, D., Matthews, J., Westrupp, E., Cann, W., Ukoumunne, O., Bennetts, S., Phan, T., Scicluna, A., Trajanovska, M., Yu, M., Nicholson, J., Hackworth, N. J., Westrupp, E. M., Ukoumunne, O. C., Bennetts, S. K., & Nicholson, J. M. (2017). Impact of a Brief Group Intervention to Enhance Parenting and the Home Learning Environment for Children Aged 6-36 Months: a Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial. Prevention Science, 18(3), 337–349. 10.1186/s12887-016-0610-1 

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Abstract: This study evaluated the effectiveness of a group parenting intervention designed to strengthen the home learning environment of children from disadvantaged families. Two cluster randomised controlled superiority trials were conducted in parallel and delivered within existing services: a 6-week parenting group (51 locations randomised; 986 parents) for parents of infants (aged 6-12 months), and a 10-week facilitated playgroup (58 locations randomised; 1200 parents) for parents of toddlers (aged 12-36 months). Each trial had three conditions: intervention (smalltalk group-only); enhanced intervention with home coaching (smalltalk plus); and 'standard'/usual practice controls. Parent-report and observational measures were collected at baseline, 12 and 32 weeks follow-up. Primary outcomes were parent verbal responsivity and home learning activities at 32 weeks. In the infant trial, there were no differences by trial arm for the primary outcomes at 32 weeks. In the toddler trial at 32-weeks, participants in the smalltalk group-only trial showed improvement compared to the standard program for parent verbal responsivity (effect size (ES) = 0.16; 95% CI 0.01, 0.36) and home learning activities (ES = 0.17; 95% CI 0.01, 0.38) but smalltalk plus did not. For the secondary outcomes in the infant trial, several initial differences favouring smalltalk plus were evident at 12 weeks, but not maintained to 32 weeks. For the toddler trial, differences in secondary outcomes favouring smalltalk plus were evident at 12 weeks and maintained to 32 weeks. These trials provide some evidence of the benefits of a parenting intervention focused on the home learning environment for parents of toddlers but not infants.


Keywords: Early childhood intervention; Home learning environment; Cluster randomized controlled trial; Parenting; Parent–child interactions.

 

Article: https://europepmc.org/article/med/27255588

 

Parenting styles, feeding styles and food-related parenting practices in relation to toddlers’ eating styles: A cluster-analytic approach

Van der Horst, K., & Sleddens, E. F. C. (2017). Parenting styles, feeding styles and food-related parenting practices in relation to toddlers’ eating styles: A cluster-analytic approach. PLoS ONE, 12(5), 1–16. 

10.1371/journal.pone.0178149

Abstract: Introduction: Toddlers’ eating behaviors are influenced by the way parents interact with their children. The objective of this study was to explore how five major constructs of general parenting behavior cluster in parents of toddlers. These parenting clusters were further explored to see how they differed in the use of feeding strategies (i.e. feeding styles and food parenting practices) and by reported child eating styles. Methods: An online survey with 1005 mothers/caregivers (legal guardians) with at least one child between 12 and 36 months old was conducted in the United States in 2012, assessing general parenting behavior, feeding style, food parenting practices and the child eating styles. Results: A three cluster solution of parenting style was found and clusters were labelled as overprotective/supervising, authoritarian, and authoritative. The clusters differed in terms of general parenting behaviors. Both overprotective and authoritative clusters showed high scores on structure, behavioral control, and nurturance. The overprotective cluster scored high on overprotection. The ‘authoritarian’ cluster showed lowest levels of nurturance, structure and behavioral control. Overprotective and authoritative parents showed very similar patterns in the use of food parenting practices, e.g. monitoring food intake, modeling, and promoting healthy food intake and availability at home. Overprotective parents also reported higher use of pressure to eat and involvement. Authoritarian parents reported high use of giving the child control over their food behaviors, emotion regulation, using food as a reward, and controlling food intake for weight control. Children’s eating styles did not largely vary by parenting cluster. Conclusion: This study showed that a relatively new parenting style of overprotection is relevant for children’s eating behaviors. Overprotective parents reported food parenting practices that are known to be beneficial for children’s food intake, such as modelling healthy food intake, as well as more unfavorable practices such as pressure. Longitudinal data on parenting practices and their relation to healthy eating in children is needed to inform communication and interventions for parents, reinforcing key feeding strategies which have positive effects on child eating behaviors and addressing parenting styles that have unintended negative effects.


Keywords: Age groups; Behavior; Biology and life sciences; Child health; Children; Diet; Eating; Eating habits; Families; Food; Habits; Medicine and health sciences; Nutrition; Parenting behavior; Pediatrics; People and places; Physiological processes; Physiology; Population groupings; Public and occupational health; Research Article; Toddlers.  

Article: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28542555/

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Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for toddlers: A pilot study

Kohlhoff, J., & Morgan, S. (2014). Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for toddlers: A pilot study. Child & Family Behavior Therapy, 36, 121-139.
https://doi.org/10.1080/07317107.2014.910733

Abstract: Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is an evidence-based program used to treat behavioral disorders in early childhood (2–7 years; Eyberg, 1988). This article describes a modified version of PCIT for young toddlers (PCIT-T) adapted to meet the developmental needs of children aged 12–24 months. A pilot study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of PCIT-T with 29 parent-toddler dyads (children aged <2 years) presenting with significant behavior problems, assessed pretreatment and posttreatment. Outcomes for two groups of older children who participated
in PCIT (Group 1: 2–3 years, n ¼ 29; Group 2: 3–4 years, n ¼ 29) were also assessed. Results showed PCIT-T to be associated with a range of positive child and parental outcomes including decreased intensity of disruptive child behaviors, increased parental utilization of PCIT parenting skills, decreased parental depressive symptoms, and high levels of consumer satisfaction with the program. This study provides early evidence that a modified version of PCIT can be successfully used to treat behavior disorders in children aged less than 2 years.


Keywords: PCIT; Model Adaptation Studies; Disruptive Behavior Disorders; Early Intervention; Parenting; Toddlers.

Article: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07317107.2014.910733

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Parent-Child Attunement Therapy for toddlers: A behaviorally oriented, play-based parent training model 

Dombrowski, S. C., Timmer, S. G., & Zebell, N. (2008). Parent-Child Attunement Therapy for toddlers: A behaviorally oriented, play-based parent training model. In C. E. Schaefer, S. Kelly-Zion, J. McCormick, & A. Ohnogi (Eds). Play therapy for very young children, pp. 125-155. Lanham, MD: Jason Aronson, Inc.

Abstract: Toddlerhood is a critical period that lays the foundation for later development. It is important for fostering attachment security, solidifying the relationship between caregivers and children, and developing cognitive and language skills. Toddlerhood also requires a new set of developmental tasks that focus on self-development, emotion regulation and social representational models. Certain types of dysfunctional caregiver-toddler relationship patterns can contribute to less than optimal social-emotional development and a variety of pathological symptoms that might elicit need for prevention or intervention. Accordingly, there is significant need for empirically supported therapeutic approaches that address these difficult behaviors. Parent-Child Attunement Therapy (PCAT) is a promising behaviorally based, play therapeutic modality that is suitable for this purpose. PCAT is based upon the rich clinical and empirical tradition of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), which has been documented in preschool and early elementary school children to improve behavioral adjustment and establish a stronger bond between caregivers and children. Parent Child Attunement Therapy (PCAT) represents an adaptation of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) and is guided by a similar theoretical approach and clinical tradition, appropriately modified for the toddler stage of development. Like PCIT, PCAT focuses on enhancing the caregiver-child relationship and improving the toddler's behavior through in vivo parent-coaching sessions. This is accomplished by increasing caregivers' attention to children's positive and appropriate behavior, decreasing attention to inappropriate behavior, and instructing parents on how to follow their children's lead in play in a nondirective fashion. Because the goals of PCAT involve consistent attention to children's appropriate behavior, caregivers become more accessible and the behavior of both the caregivers and the toddlers becomes more predictable. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)


Keywords: PCIT; Book Chapters; Toddlers. 

Article: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2008-14952-006

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A positive behavioural intervention for toddlers: Parent-Child Attunement Therapy 

Dombrowski, S. C., Timmer, S. G., Blacker, D. M., & Urquiza, A. J. (2005). A positive behavioural intervention for toddlers: Parent-Child Attunement Therapy. Child Abuse Review, 14,  132-151. 10.1002/car.888

Abstract: Parent–child attunement therapy (PCAT) is a promising intervention for toddlers (aged 12–30 months) who have experienced maltreatment. PCAT has two overall purposes: (1) to strengthen caregivers’ relationship with their children; and (2) to facilitate caregivers’ learning of appropriate child management techniques. PCAT represents an adaptation of parent–child interaction therapy (PCIT), which has been empirically documented in preschool and early elementary schoolchildren to improve behavioural adjustment and engender a stronger bond between caregiver and child. There is, however, a noted paucity of intervention research for toddlers, specifically maltreated toddlers. As toddlerhood represents a critical period for enhancing the relationship between caregivers and children and is a stage when youngsters are at increased risk for maltreatment, the objectives of PCAT become even more salient during the toddler years. The purpose of this study, therefore, is to introduce PCAT and then examine its effectiveness through a single case study of a 23-month-old maltreated toddler and his biological mother. Pre- and post-assessment measures included the Parenting Stress Index, the Dyadic Parent–Child Interaction Coding System (DPICS), the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), the Emotional Availability (EA) Scales and the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI). The results of this study demonstrate the effectiveness of PCAT in increasing the number of positive caregiver–toddler interactions and enhancing the overall quality of the caregiver–toddler relationship. Practitioners will be able to use the techniques described in this manuscript to improve the parent–toddler relationship and ameliorate many commonly experienced behavioural difficulties found among maltreatment-prone parent–toddler dyads. Therapeutic progress is easily charted so that effectiveness may be documented and termination of therapy may be easily discerned.


Keywords: PCIT; Child Maltreatment; Toddler; Model Adaptation Study; Dyadic Parent Child Interaction Coding System; DPICS; PCAT; Maltreatment; Parent Training; Behavioural Intervention.

Article: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/car.888

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Development of the Impact of a Preschool Obesity Prevention Intervention Enhanced With Positive Behavioral Supports for Mississippi Head Start Centers.

Huye, H. F., Connell, C. L., Dufrene, B. A., Mohn, R. S., Newkirk, C., Tannehill, J., & Sutton, V. (2020). Development of the Impact of a Preschool Obesity Prevention Intervention Enhanced With Positive Behavioral Supports for Mississippi Head Start Centers. Journal of Nutrition Education & Behavior, 52(12), 1148–1159. 10.1016/j.jneb.2020.09.010 

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Abstract: Objective: To describe the methodology of the Impact of a Preschool Obesity Prevention intervention enhanced with positive behavioral supports. Design: The social ecological model serves as the conceptual framework for this study, which has a within-and between-subjects design with an intervention group and a delayed intervention control group. This 3-year project will use formative methods to pretest materials in Year 1, collect data pre- and postintervention with a follow-up at 4 months in Years 2 and 3, and conduct summative and process evaluation in Year 3. Setting: Head Start centers in Southern and East-Central Mississippi counties. Participants: Three hundred parents with 3-year-old children enrolled in 9 Head Start centers (53 classrooms) and 75 Head Start teachers. Interventions: During Year 2, Hip Hop to Health Jr., Parent-Child Interaction Therapy, and Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports will be implemented. Main Outcome Measures: Primary outcomes include changes in parenting and teacher practices. Secondary outcomes include parent feeding styles as well as weight status and dietary intake. Variables will be measured using anthropometrics and validated surveys. Analysis: The primary analysis will be a multilevel 2 × 3 mixed ANOVA.


Keywords: Head Start; Nutrition intervention protocol; Positive parenting.

Article: https://europepmc.org/article/med/33308516

 

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy as a Behavior and Spoken Language Intervention for Young Children With Hearing Loss.

Costa, E. A., Day, L., Caverly, C., Mellon, N., Ouellette, M., & Ottley, S. W. (2019). Parent-Child Interaction Therapy as a Behavior and Spoken Language Intervention for Young Children With Hearing Loss. Language, Speech & Hearing Services in Schools, 50(1), 34–52. 10.1044/2018_LSHSS-18-0054

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Abstract: Purpose: The importance of early intervention for fostering language in children with hearing loss has been well documented; those that facilitate parent engagement are particularly effective. Listening and spoken language outcomes among children with hearing loss continue to fall short compared to hearing peers, despite improvements in hearing technologies. The current study evaluated the effectiveness of parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT) as a behavioral intervention for children with hearing loss and its applicability as a language intervention. Method: PCIT effectiveness was evaluated for children with hearing loss (PCIT treatment group: N = 18). For a subset of the treatment group (matched experimental group: n = 6), pretreatment and posttreatment language samples were compared to a matched control group (n = 6). Results: Significant changes were observed in parent skills and child behavior from pretreatment to posttreatment for the PCIT treatment group. A subset of the treatment group (matched experimental group) with available matched controls (matched control group) demonstrated a significant increase in utterances and a trend toward significant increase in receptive vocabulary compared to the control group. Conclusion: PCIT is a promising intervention for children with hearing loss that empowers parents to engage in optimal indirect language stimulation, improves parent-child interactions, improves child behavior, and promotes spoken language skills. 


Keywords: Speech; Language development; Hearing loss; PCIT.

Article: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30950776/

 

NP31 Development of the Family Meal Project: A Family Nutrition Ecosystem Intervention to Prevent Childhood Overweight/Obesity

Frazier, S., Campa, A., & Coccia, C. (2019). NP31 Development of the Family Meal Project: A Family Nutrition Ecosystem Intervention to Prevent Childhood Overweight/Obesity. Journal of Nutrition Education & Behavior, 51, S24. 10.1016/j.jneb.2019.05.355

Abstract: To develop a family nutrition ecosystem program to improve parent-child food interactions, family modeling and family food access by enhancing parent knowledge, attitudes and self-efficacy. Though childhood obesity is multi-causal, parents help shape children's eating behaviors making them an important target for nutrition education. In the current study, Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) informed the predicted pathways to parents' health behavior change and the Theory of Diffusion of Innovation informed the planned dissemination of nutrition education information via interpersonal (in-person workshops), mass media (website) and social media. The resulting three-component intervention The Family Meal Project targets family mealtime interactions by applying an empirically supported parenting intervention to parent-child mealtime interactions, while attending to the unique considerations of Latino families representing this growing demographic in the targeted community. Component 1 involves multi-family groups (six, 2-hour sessions) that incorporate principles and strategies from, Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), modified for diet behaviors and implemented by Masters level dietetic students. Groups include a family meal (with modeling and coaching), review of the past week, nutrition psychoeducation and goal setting. While parents participate in programming, children join health-related activities facilitated by research staff. Component 2 is a program support website (familymealproject.fiu.edu) available to parents at the start of the intervention and continuously updated to reflect parent feedback. Component 3 is a social-media based nutrition education extension containing food-related messages through Instagram, Facebook and Pinterest. The program will be evaluated during Year 2 using a pre-post intervention design model. Participants will include families (n = 30) with at least one child (4-10 years) recruited from participating elementary schools (90% minority, 95% Hispanic). Repeated Measure ANOVAs and regression analysis will test changes over time. Qualitative data from interviews and focus groups will inform revisions to intervention. We expect parents will exhibit increased knowledge of food and mealtime-related parenting behaviors, increase self-efficacy to provide healthy nutrition opportunities, and enhance their family nutrition ecosystem. Future directions include further testing in a randomized clinical controlled trial. 2018-68001-27552.


Keywords: Prevention of childhood obesity; Families; Biotic communities; Conferences & conventions; Intellect; Nutrition; Nutrition education; Parent-child relationships; Self-efficacy; Human services programs; ; Parent attitudes; Education. 

Article: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S149940461930586X

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Efficacy of parent-child interaction therapy on anxiety symptoms in cochlear implanted deaf children

Javadi, N., Keshavarzi, A. F., & Hasanzadeh, S. (2018). Efficacy of parent-child interaction therapy on anxiety symptoms in cochlear implanted deaf children. Journal of Hearing Science, 8(2), 322. 10.1017/S0954579409000212

Abstract: Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of parent-child interaction therapy on the anxiety symptoms of cochlear implanted deaf children. Materials and Methods: This is an experimental study designed as pretest-posttest with control group in the form of random assignment to two experimental and control groups. The statistical population of the present study included deaf children aged 7 to 11 years old with cochlear implants referring to Tehran cochlear implantation centers in 2017. Among these centers, the Pejvak auditoryverbal rehabilitation center was selected by cluster sampling. The subjects were sampled among the referents with required characteristics through a targeted method. The deaf children (n= 30) with implanted cochlea were randomly divided into two experimental (n= 15) and control (n = 15) groups. The parents of these children completed the Achenbach questionnaire/parent form (CBCL) and anxiety subscale. Data were analyzed by covariance test. Results: Comparing the mean values of the experimental and control groups showed that average anxiety symptoms in the experimental group decreased significantly compared to the control group in the post-test. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that parent-child interaction therapy has an effect on the anxiety symptoms of cochlear implanted deaf children.


Keywords: Conferences & conventions; Anxiety; Cochlear implants; Deaf children; Parent-child relationships.

Article: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2730756/

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Adapting Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for deaf families that communicate via American Sign Language: A formal adaptation approach 

Day, L. A., Costa, E. A., Previ, D., & Caverly, C. (2017). Adapting Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for deaf families that communicate via American Sign Language: A formal adaptation approach. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 25 (1), 7-21. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpra.2017.01.008

Abstract: While our field has made positive strides in adapting psychotherapeutic interventions for diverse groups of people, considerable work is still needed in this area. We present our formal adaptation procedure for parent–child interaction therapy (PCIT) with Deaf persons.  This includes a review of the cultural adaptation process for psychological interventions, including PCIT, as well as an introduction to  Deaf culture. Details regarding the specific adaptation of PCIT for Deaf persons are outlined. We found that the utilization of a clear framework to guide the cultural adaptation process facilitated careful consideration of the numerous linguistic and cultural variables involved, while maintaining integrity of the treatment model. While the current focus was on adapting PCIT for Deaf families who communicate via American Sign Language, this framework can also be applied to other populations and/or interventions. 


Keywords: PCIT; Model Adaptation Studies; Deaf; Psychotherapy Adaptation; Ecological Validity Theory. 

Article: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1077722917300305?via%3Dihub

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Assessing the effectiveness of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with language delayed children: A clinical investigation

Falkus, G., Tilley, C., Thomas, C., Hockey, H., Kennedy, A., Arnold, T., Thorburn, B., Jones, K., Patel, B., Piments, C., Shah, R., Tweedie, F., O'Brien, F., Leahy, R., & Pring, T. (2016). Assessing the effectiveness of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with language delayed children: A clinical investigation. Child Language Teaching and Therapy, 32, 7-17.
https://doi.org/10.1177/0265659015574918

Abstract: Parent–child interaction therapy (PCIT) is widely used by speech and language therapists to improve the interactions between children with delayed language development and their parents/carers. Despite favourable reports of the therapy from clinicians, little evidence of its effectiveness is available. We investigated the effects of PCIT as practised by clinicians within a clinical setting. Eighteen consecutive children referred for speech and language therapy because of their delayed language were entered in the study. A within-participants design was used, and the procedure was similar to that used clinically. Blind assessments were conducted twice before therapy to monitor change without therapy and once after completing PCIT. Significant changes in a parent rating scale, the children’s mean length of utterance and the ratio of time of child to parent speech were found after the therapy. No changes were detected prior to therapy. The similarity of the design to clinical practice and the use of several clinicians suggest that the findings can be generalized to other settings and clinicians. These findings are a first step in evaluating PCIT; we now need to show that parents can maintain their newly acquired skills in interaction, and that this benefits their children’s communication.


Keywords: PCIT; Clinical Disorders; General Outcome Studies; Children; Interaction; Intervention; Language Delay; Parents. 

Article: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0265659015574918

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Parent-Child Interaction Therapy and moderate pediatric traumatic brain injury: A case study

Garcia, D., Barroso, N. E., Kuluz, J., & Bagner, D. M. (2016). Parent-Child Interaction Therapy and moderate pediatric traumatic brain injury: A case study. Evidence-Based Practice in Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 1, 40-50.
https://doi.org/10.1080/23794925.2016.1191977

Abstract: The objective of this article is to present a case study examining the use of Parent–Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) for a 5-year-old African American girl from an economically disadvantaged background who sustained a moderate traumatic brain injury. “Victoria’s” preinjury history, family environment, and injury characteristics are detailed along with the results of her baseline, postintervention, and follow-up assessments. Following 11 sessions of PCIT over 7 months, Victoria no longer met diagnostic criteria for oppositional defiant disorder and showed clinically significant decreases in her externalizing behavior problems at the end of treatment. However, maintenance of treatment gains was not observed at the 6-month follow-up assessment. The current case study highlights some of the advantages and challenges associated with the use of PCIT to treat externalizing behavior problems in young children with traumatic brain injury, especially those from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. Further examination of behavioral interventions with larger samples is needed to meet the needs of this high-risk population.


Keywords: PCIT; Clinical Disorders; Oppositional Defiant Disorder; International & Cultural Studies; Low-Income; Traumatic Brain Injury; Clinical Disorders; Oppositional Defiant Disorder. 

Article: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/23794925.2016.1191977

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The practical side of working with Parent–Child Interaction Therapy with preschool children with language impairments

Klatte, L.S., & Roulstone, S. (2016). The practical side of working with Parent–Child Interaction Therapy with preschool children with language impairments. Child Language Teaching and Therapy, 32, 345-359.

https://doi.org/10.1177/0265659016641999

Abstract: A common early intervention approach for preschool children with language problems is parent–child interaction therapy (PCIT). PCIT has positive effects for children with expressive language problems. It appears that speech and language therapists (SLTs) conduct this therapy in many different ways. This might be because of the variety of approaches available, the diverse set of families SLTs work with or the different organizational structures. Understanding the critical components of PCIT would enable SLTs to map the variations that are implemented and researchers to evaluate the effects of such variation. This study aimed to identify the potentially critical components of PCIT based on the practical experience of SLTs and to identify SLTs’ rationales for the way they structure PCIT. Both parameters are important for the long term goal, that is, to develop a framework that can be used to support practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 SLTs who had at least one year experience in delivering PCIT with preschool children with language impairment. The interviews were transcribed and analysed, using thematic analysis. Analysis of the SLT interview data identified four potentially critical components that underpin the teaching of strategies to parents: parents’ engagement, parents’ understanding, parents’ reflection and therapists’ skills. SLTs suggested that all four components are needed for the successful delivery of PCIT. The reasons that SLTs give for the way in which they structure PCIT are mainly based on organizational constraints, family needs and practicalities. SLTs consider PCIT to be valuable but challenging to implement. A framework that makes explicit these components may be beneficial to support practice.


Keywords: PCIT; Clinical Disorders; Engagement; Language Impairment; Parent–child Interaction Therapy; Preschool Children; Therapy; Toddler. 

Article: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0265659016641999

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Combining Parent–Child Interaction Therapy and visual supports for the treatment of challenging behavior in a child with autism and intellectual disabilities and comorbid epilepsy

Armstrong, K., DeLoatche, K. J., Preece, K. K. & Agazzi, H. (2015). Combining Parent–Child Interaction Therapy and visual supports for the treatment of challenging behavior in a child with autism and intellectual disabilities and comorbid epilepsy. Clinical Case Studies, 14, 3-14.
https://doi.org/10.1177/1534650114531451

Abstract: About one in six children has one or more developmental disabilities, which include autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disabilities (ID). Individuals with both ASD and ID are at higher risk of epilepsy, and those with younger onset of seizures are at higher risk of both developmental and behavioral disorders. Young children presenting with developmental and behavioral challenges are often very difficult for caregivers to manage, and challenging
behavior results in reduced learning opportunities. Finding effective and efficient interventions to address behavioral issues remains a clinical priority to improve overall outcomes for all children and especially those with developmental disabilities. This case study presents the treatment of a 5-year-old girl diagnosed with ASD, ID, and comorbid epilepsy using Parent–Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) combined with visual supports (VS). Findings from this case report
documented (a) an improvement in behavioral functioning in home, school, and community settings; (b) evidence for the effectiveness of parent-mediated intervention; and (c) support for collaboration and care coordination to improve intervention outcomes


Keywords: PCIT; Clinical Disorders; Autism Spectrum Disorder; Intellectual Disabilities; Epilepsy. 

Article: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1534650114531451

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Language production in children with and at risk for delay: Mediating role of parenting skills 

Garcia, D., Bagner, D. M., Pruden, S. M., & Nichols-Lopez, K. (2015). Language production in children with and at risk for delay: Mediating role of parenting skills. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 44, 814-25. 

Abstract: The current study examined the effect of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), a parent-training intervention for child behavior problems, on child language production. Participants were 46 children (ages 20-70 months) with externalizing behavior prob