Meta-Analysis & Review Articles

Meta-Analysis Articles

 
Does Parent–Child Interaction Therapy reduce future physical abuse? A meta-analysis (abstract)

Kennedy, S. C., Kim, J. S., Tripodi, S. J., Brown, S. M., & Gowdy, G. (2016)

Parent–Child Interaction Therapy for child disruptive behaviour disorders: A meta-analysis (abstract)

Ward, M. A., & Theule, J. (2016)

Parent–Child Interaction Therapy: A meta-analysis of child behavior outcomes and parent stress (abstract)

Cooley, M. E., Veldorale-Griffin, A., Petren, R. E., & Mullis, A. K. (2014)

Effects of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy on young children with disruptive behavior disorders (abstract)

Gallagher, N. (2003)

 

Review Articles

Understanding manual-based behavior therapy: Some theoretical foundations of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (abstract)

Greco, L. A., Sorrell, J. T., & McNeil, C. B. (2001)

Effective psychosocial treatments of conduct-disordered children and adolescents: 29 years, 82 studies, and 5,272 kids (abstract)

Brestan, E. V., & Eyberg, S. M. (1998)

Does Parent–Child Interaction Therapy reduce future physical abuse? A meta-analysis

Kennedy, S. C., Kim, J. S., Tripodi, S. J., Brown, S. M., & Gowdy, G. (2016). Does Parent–Child Interaction Therapy reduce future physical abuse? A meta-analysis. Research on Social Work Practice, 26, 147-156.
https://doi.org/10.1177/1049731514543024

Abstract: Objective: To use meta-analytic techniques to evaluating the effectiveness of parent–child interaction therapy (PCIT) at reducing future physical abuse among physically abusive families. 


Methods: A systematic search identified six eligible studies. Outcomes of interest were physical abuse recurrence, child abuse potential, and parenting stress. 


Results: Parents receiving PCIT had significantly fewer physical abuse recurrences and significantly greater reductions on the Parenting Stress Index than parents in comparison groups. Reductions in child abuse potential were nonsignificant, although 95% confidence intervals suggest clinically meaningful treatment effects. The studies examining physical abuse recurrence had a medium treatment effect (g ¼ 0.52), while results from pooled effect size estimates for child abuse potential (g ¼ 0.31) and parenting stress (g ¼ 0.35) were small. 


Conclusions: PCIT appears to be effective at reducing physical abuse recurrence and parenting stress for physically abusive families, with the largest treatment effects seen on long-term physical abuse recurrence. Applications to social work practice are discussed.


Keywords:  Parent–Child Interaction Therapy; Child Physical Abuse; Child Welfare; Meta-analysis.

Article: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1049731514543024

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Parent–Child Interaction Therapy for child disruptive behaviour disorders: A meta-analysis

Ward, M. A., & Theule, J. (2016). Parent–Child Interaction Therapy for child disruptive behaviour disorders: A meta-analysis. Child & Youth Care Form, 45, 675-690.

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10566-016-9350-5 

Abstract: Background: Numerous studies have looked at the efficacy of Parent–Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) for young children with externalizing behaviour problems.


Objective: The present study compiled these results through a comprehensive review to provide greater clarity regarding the efficacy of this treatment.


Methods: Using a random effects model, a meta-analysis was conducted to determine the weighted mean effect size. To be included in this analysis, studies were required to have implemented PCIT with children (ages 2–5) with clinically significant externalizing behaviour problems. Twelve studies comprising 254 treated and 118 control group children were included, with the majority of children being White males. This research also assessed whether gender and type of disruptive behaviour disorder (DBD) moderated the effectiveness of PCIT.

Results: PCIT had a large effect on improving externalizing behaviour problems in children with DBD based on the effect size derived from pre- and post-treatment behavioural outcomes (d = 1.65, 95 % CI [1.41, 1.90], p\.001) and treatment and control group data (d = 1.39, 95 % CI [1.05, 1.73], p\.001). Neither gender nor diagnosis was found to significantly moderate the effectiveness.


Keywords: PCIT; Reviews Articles; Meta-Analysis; Clinical Disorders; Children; Disruptive Behavior Disorders; Family Therapy.

Article: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10566-016-9350-5

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Parent–Child Interaction Therapy: A meta-analysis of child behavior outcomes and parent stress

Cooley, M. E., Veldorale-Griffin, A., Petren, R. E., & Mullis, A. K. (2014).  Parent–Child Interaction Therapy: A meta-analysis of child behavior outcomes and parent stress. Journal of Family Social Work, 17, 191-208.
https://doi.org/10.1080/10522158.2014.888696

Abstract: Parent–Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is a behavioral family therapy approach that aims to establish a parent–child relationship that will enable parents to teach their preschool-age child prosocial skills, leading to a decrease in inappropriate and maladaptive behaviors. The purpose of this article is to review recent research on PCIT and conduct a meta-analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of this parenting intervention as reported in 11 studies that met criteria for involvement. In addition to child behavior, this meta-analysis focuses on parenting stress as a primary outcome of interest. The authors found an emphasis on effectiveness, dissemination, and portability to diverse populations in our review of PCIT outcome studies from 2004 to 2011. Implications for practice, policy, and research are addressed.


Keywords: PCIT; Meta-Analyses; Parent; Training; Parent & Child; Behavioral Parent Training.\

Article: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10522158.2014.888696

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Effects of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy on young children with disruptive behavior disorders

Gallagher, N. (2003).  Effects of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy on young children with disruptive behavior disorders. Bridges Practice-Based Research Syntheses, 1, 1-17. 

Abstract: The behavioral and social-emotional consequences of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) were examined in 17 studies of preschool-age children identified as exhibiting a disruptive behavior disorder. These studies included 628 children, 368 of whom participated in parent-child interaction therapy. Study findings revealed that involvement in PCIT results in statistically and clinically significant improvements in child behavior functioning. While there is some evidence that PCIT positively impacts social-emotional development, this evidence is less compelling. Implications for practice are described in terms of core relationship-building and discipline skills that parents should implement in order to optimize child behavior functioning.


Keywords: PCIT; Clinical Disorders; Externalizing Disorders; Disruptive Behaviors.

Article: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/228356427_Effects_of_Parent-child_Interaction_Therapy_on_young_children_with_disruptive_behavior_disorders

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Understanding manual-based behavior therapy: Some theoretical foundations of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy

Greco, L. A., Sorrell, J. T., & McNeil, C. B. (2001). Understanding manual-based behavior therapy: Some theoretical foundations of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy. Child & Behavior Therapy, 23, 21-36. https://doi.org/10.1300/J019v23n04_02

Abstract: Manualized therapy has been criticized as being incompatible with behavior therapy. However, the majority of empirically supported, manual-based therapies utilize basic behavioral principles, such as positive reinforcement, to achieve positive change in the target behavior. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), for example, is a manualized treatment that makes extensive use of the empirically-derived behavioral principles of this paradigm. Understanding how and why these fundamental principles operate is essential when attempting to tailor the program ideographically to meet clients' specific needs. The purpose of this article is to provide a model of understanding and evaluating manualized treatments by beginning with a review of the theory and data-driven principals upon which PCIT is based. As a point of illustration, several of the behavioral principles embedded in PCIT, such as reinforcement, punishment, and stimulus control, are highlighted, and clinically relevant examples are presented.


Keywords: PCIT; Review Articles; Manual-Based Behavior Therapy. 

Article: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J019v23n04_02

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Effective psychosocial treatments of conduct-disordered children and adolescents: 29 years, 82 studies, and 5,272 kids

Brestan, E. V., & Eyberg, S. M. (1998). Effective psychosocial treatments of conduct-disordered children and adolescents: 29 years, 82 studies, and 5,272 kids. Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, 27,180-189.
https://doi.org/10.1207/s15374424jccp2702_5

Abstract: 
Keywords:

Article: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/9648035/

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