Externalizing

Disorders

 

Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Articles

 
Parent–Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) for young children with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in Japan (abstract)

Hosogane, N., Kodaira, M., Kihara, N., Saito, K., & Kamo, T. (2018).

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with emotion coaching for preschoolers with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (abstract)

Chronis-Tuscano, A., Lewis-Morrarty, E., Woods, K. E., O'Brien, K. A., Mazursky-Horowitz, H., & Thomas, S. R. (2016)

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for ADHD: A conceptual overview and critical literature review (abstract)

Wagner, S. M., & McNeil, C. B. (2008)

Evidence-based psychosocial treatments for children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (abstract)

Chronis, A. M., Jones, H. A., & Raggi, V. L. (2006)

Parent training through play: Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with a hyperactive child (abstract)

Johnson, B. D., Franklin, L.C., Hall, K., & Prieto, L. R. (2000)

Behavior modification in the treatment of ADHD (abstract)

Eyberg, S. M., Schuhmann, E. M., & Foote, R. C. (1998) 

Autism Spectrum Disorder Articles

 
Group PCIT for Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Externalizing Behavior Problems (abstract)

Ros, R., & Graziano, P. A. (2019).

Child-directed interaction training for young children with autism spectrum disorders: Parent and child outcomes (abstract)

Ginn, N. C., Clionsky, L. N., Eyberg, S. M., Warner-Metzger, C., & Abner, J. P. (2017)

Open-trial pilot of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder (abstract)

Zlomke, K. R., Jeter, K., & Murphy, J. (2017)

Examining the efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with children on the autism spectrum (abstract)

Masse, J. J., McNeil, C. B., Wagner, S., & Quetsch, L. B. (2016)

Using a modified Parent-Child Interaction Therapy to increase vocalizations in children with autism (abstract)

Hansen, B., & Shillingburg, M. A. (2016)

Parent–Child Interaction Therapy and autism spectrum disorder: Adaptations with a child with severe developmental delays (abstract)

Lesack, R., Bearss, K., Celano, M., & Sharp, W. G. (2014)

The effectiveness of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for families of children on the autism spectrum (abstract)

Solomon, M., Ono, M., Timmer, S., & Goodlin-Jones, B. (2008) 

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy and high functioning autism: A conceptual overview (abstract)

Masse, J. J., McNeil, C. B., Wagner, S. M., & Chorney, D. B. (2008)

Conduct Disorder Articles

 
Parent-Child Interaction Therapy Adapted for Preschoolers with Callous-Unemotional Traits: An Open Trial Pilot Study (abstract)

Kimonis, E. R., Fleming, G., Briggs, N., Brouwer-French, L., Frick, P. J., Hawes, D. J., Bagner, D. M., Thomas, R., & Dadds, M. (2019).

Parent training outcomes among young children with callous-unemotional conduct problems with or at risk for developmental delay (abstract)

Kimonis, E. R., Bagner, D. M., Linares, D., Blake, C. A., & Rodríguez, G. M. (2014)

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: An effective treatment for young children with conduct problems (abstract)

Capage, L. C., Foote, R., McNeil, C. B., & Eyberg, S. M. (1998) 

Oppositional Defiant Disorder Articles

 
Oppositional defiant disorder and parent training (abstract)

Eyberg, S. M., O'Brien, K. A., & Chase, R. M. (2006)

Parenting disruptive preschoolers: Experiences of mothers and fathers (abstract)

Calzada, E. J., Eyberg, S. M., Rich, B., & Querido, J. G. (2004)

Additional Articles

 

Shawler, P. M., Elizabeth Bard, M., Taylor, E. K., Wilsie, C., Funderburk, B., & Silovsky, J. F. (2018).

Treating multi-problem, high stress families: Suggested strategies for practitioners (abstract)

McNeil, C. B., & Herschell, A. D. (1998)

Management of disruptive behavior in young children (abstract)

Eyberg, S. M., & Neary, E. M. (2002)

 

INTERNALIZING

DISORDERS

 

Separation Anxiety Disorder Articles

The implementation of modified Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for youth with separation anxiety disorder (abstract)

Pincus, D. B., Santucci, L. C., Ehrenreich, J. T., & Eyberg, S. M. (2008) 

Adapting Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for young children with separation anxiety disorder (abstract)

Pincus, D. B., Eyberg, S. M., & Choate, M. L. (2005)

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for treatment of separation anxiety disorder in young children: A pilot study (abstract)

Choate, M. L., Pincus, D. B., Eyberg, S. M., & Barlow, D. H. (2005)

Mood Disorder Articles

 
Neural Indicators of Anhedonia: Predictors and Mechanisms of Treatment Change in a Randomized Clinical Trial in Early Childhood Depression (abstract)

Barch, D. M., Whalen, D., Gilbert, K., Kelly, D., Kappenman, E. S., Hajcak, G., & Luby, J. L. (2019).

A novel early intervention for preschool depression: Findings from a pilot randomized controlled trial (abstract)

Luby, J., Lenze, S., & Tillman, R. (2012)

Early childhood depression (abstract)

Luby, J. L. (2009)

Treatment of preschool bipolar disorder: A novel Parent-Child Interaction Therapy and review of data on psychopharmacology (abstract)

Luby, J. L., Stalets, M. M., Blankenship, S., Pautsch, J., & McGrath, M. (2008)

Generalized Anxiety Disorder Articles

 
Generalization of an Early Intervention for Inhibited Preschoolers to the Classroom Setting (abstract)

Barstead, M. G., Danko, C. M., Chronis-Tuscano, A., O, B. K. A., Coplan, R. J., & Rubin, K. H. (2018).

Comparison of the Effectiveness of Two Cognitive-Behavioral and Mother-Child Interactive Therapies on Anxiety of Children with Under-Methadone Treatment Mother (abstract)

Pirnia B, Rasoulzadeh Tabatabaei SK, Pirkhaefi A, & Soleimani A. (2017).

Adapting Parent-Child Interaction Therapy to treat anxiety disorders in young children (abstract)

Puliafico, A. C., Comer, J. S., & Pincus, D. B. (2012)

Intellectual Disability & Developmental Delay Articles

 
Barriers to success in parent training for young children with developmental delay: The role of cumulative risk (abstract)

Bagner, D. M.,& Graziano, P. A. (2013)

Parent Child Interaction Therapy for children with disruptive behavior and developmental disabilities (abstract)

McDiarmid, M. D., & Bagner, D. M. (2005)

Additional

Examining a novel, parent child interaction therapy-informed, behavioral treatment of selective mutism (abstract)

Catchpole, R., Young, A., Baer, S., & Salih, T. (2019).

Palin Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: The Bigger Picture (abstract)

Millard, S. K., Zebrowski, P., & Kelman, E. (2018).

Identification of Efficacy of Direct, Indirect and Combined Methods on Severity of Stuttering in Preschool Children (abstract)

 (2018). تعیین اثر بخشی روش های درمانی مستقیم، غیر مستقیم و ترکیبی بر شدت لکنت کودکان پیش دبستانی

 

Parent–Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) for young children with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in Japan

Hosogane, N., Kodaira, M., Kihara, N., Saito, K., & Kamo, T. (2018). Parent–Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) for young children with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in Japan. Annals of General Psychiatry, 17, 1. 10.1186/s12991-018-0180-8

Abstract: Early intervention for preschoolers with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is important considering the impact on their prognosis. Parent–Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is a psychotherapy treatment for the parent–child dyad and has been shown to be effective for children with disruptive behaviors. We present the treatment course of PCIT for two Japanese children with ADHD. Case 1 is a 2-year-old female child with hyperactivity and aggressiveness. Case 2 is a 4-year-old male child with restlessness and intolerability to daily events. For both cases, PCIT was effective in improving the problematic behaviors. PCIT may serve as a treatment option for Japanese children with ADHD.


Keywords: Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD); Parent–Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT); Preschooler; Treatment

Article: https://annals-general-psychiatry.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12991-018-0180-8

to

TOP

 

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with emotion coaching for preschoolers with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

Chronis-Tuscano, A., Lewis-Morrarty, E., Woods, K. E., O'Brien, K. A., Mazursky-Horowitz, H., & Thomas, S. R. (2016). Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with emotion coaching for preschoolers with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Cognitive and Behavioral Practices, 23, 67-68.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpra.2014.11.001

Abstract: Preschoolers with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at increased risk for the development of comorbid conduct disorder  (CD) and depression. Early predictors of serious adverse outcomes within this population include parenting characterized by high levels  of negativity and low levels of positivity, maternal depression, and child emotion regulation (ER) difficulties. Parent–child interaction  therapy (PCIT) is an evidence-based treatment for oppositional defiant disorder and CD that has also been shown to improve comorbid  child internalizing symptoms and maternal depression by enhancing parenting and improving the parent child relationship.  PCIT-emotion development (PCIT-ED) is an adaptation for depressed preschoolers, grounded in developmental literature, which teaches  parents to become “emotion coaches” for their children, in an effort to build child ER skills. In this paper, we describe the iterative process  by which we implemented and adapted PCIT-ED based on our experiences treating nine children with ADHD. We present three case  examples that exemplify our process in adapting the PCIT-ED manual. This work suggests that PCIT with parent emotion coaching  (PCIT-ECo) may be a promising treatment approach for young children with ADHD. Future research will need to examine this  adaptation relative to standard PCIT to determine whether our integration of parent emotion coaching results in added improvement in  child ER, internalizing and externalizing problems, and functional impairment.  


Keywords: PCIT; Clinical Disorders; ADHD; Preschool ADHD; PCIT-ED; Emotion Coaching; Treatment Development. 

Article: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1077722914001266?via%3Dihub

to

TOP

 

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for ADHD: A conceptual overview and critical literature review

Wagner, S. M., & McNeil, C. B. (2008). Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for ADHD: A conceptual overview and critical literature review. Child and Family Behavior Therapy, 30, 231-256.        
https://doi.org/10.1080/07317100802275546

Abstract: Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) a chronic disorder beginning in childhood, is identifiable and diagnostically valid during the preschool years. Compared to school-aged children, preschoolers have not received as much attention in the literature. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is an empirically-supported parent training program for young children with disruptive behaviors that may also be effective in treating ADHD. The purpose of the current article was to explore the theoretical rationale for utilizing PCIT with this population and to conduct a literature review of published PCIT treatment outcome studies that measured ADHD symptoms. The literature demonstrates that children with ADHD have been included in PCIT research and evidence suggests that PCIT may be effective for young children with ADHD. However, future research is needed to specifically examine the effects of PCIT on ADHD.


Keywords: PCIT; Review Articles; Clinical Disorders – ADHD; Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; preschoolers.

Article: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07317100802275546

to

TOP

 

Parent and teacher SNAP-IV ratings of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms: Psychometric properties and normative ratings from a school district sample.

Bussing, R., Fernandez, M., Harwood, M., Hou, W., Garvan, C., Swanson, J., & Eyberg, S. M. (2008). Parent and teacher SNAP-IV ratings of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms: Psychometric properties and normative ratings from a school district sample. Assessment, 15, 317-328.
https://doi.org/10.1177/1073191107313888

Abstract: To examine Swanson, Nolan, and Pelham–IV (SNAP-IV) psychometric properties, parent (N = 1,613) and teacher (N = 1,205) data were collected from a random elementary school student sample in a longitudinal attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) detection study. SNAP-IV reliability was acceptable. Factor structure indicated two ADHD factors and an oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) factor. Parent and teacher scores varied by gender and poverty status (d = .49-.56) but not age; only teacher scores varied by race (d = .25-.55). Screening and diagnostic utility was evaluated with likelihood ratios (LRs) and posttest probabilities. Parent SNAP-IV scores above 1.2 increased probability of concern (LR > 10) and above 1.8, of ADHD diagnosis (LR > 3). Teacher hyperactivity/impulsivity scores above 1.2 and inattention scores above 1.8 increased probabilities of concern only (LR = 4.2 and >5, respectively). Higher teacher scores for African American children and race differences in measurement models require future study.


Keywords: : PCIT; Clinical Disorders; ADHD; Assessment; Children; Likelihood; Ratios; Norms; SNAP-IV; Reliability; Validity

Article: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1073191107313888

to

TOP

 

Evidence-based psychosocial treatments for children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

Chronis, A. M., Jones, H. A., & Raggi, V. L. (2006). Evidence-based psychosocial treatments for children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Clinical Psychology Review, 26, 486-502.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2006.01.002

Abstract: Despite the vast literature supporting the efficacy of stimulant medication in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), several limitations of pharmacological treatments highlight the clear need for effective psychosocial treatments to be identified. A large evidence base exists for behavioral interventions, including parent training and school interventions, which has resulted in their classification as "empirically validated treatments." Additionally, social skills training with generalization components, intensive summer treatment programs, and educational interventions appear promising in the treatment of ADHD. Given the chronic impairment children with ADHD experience across multiple domains of functioning, multimodal treatments are typically necessary to normalize the behavior of these children. The state of the ADHD treatment literature is reviewed, important gaps are identified (e.g., treatment for adolescents), and directions for future research are outlined within a developmental psychopathology framework.


Keywords: PCIT; Clinical Disorders; Adolescent; Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity; Child; Evidence-Based Medicine; Humans; Psychotherapy. 

Article: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0272735806000031?via%3Dihub

to

TOP

Parent training through play: Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with a hyperactive child

Johnson, B. D., Franklin, L.C., Hall, K., & Prieto, L. R. (2000). Parent training through play: Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with a hyperactive child. Family  Journal-Counseling & Therapy for Couples & Families, 8, 180-186.   

Keywords: Keywords: PCIT; Clinical Disorders; ADHD. 

to

TOP

 
 

Behavior modification in the treatment of ADHD

Eyberg, S. M., Schuhmann, E. M., & Foote, R. C. (1998). Behavior modification in the treatment of ADHD. In B. L. Maria (Ed.). Advanced Therapy in Child Neurology (pp. 90-93). Houston, TX: Decker. 

Keywords: : PCIT; Book Chapters; Clinical Disorders; ADHD. 

to

TOP

 

Group PCIT for Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Externalizing Behavior Problems

Ros, R., & Graziano, P. A. (2019). Group PCIT for Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Externalizing Behavior Problems. Journal of Child & Family Studies, 28(5), 1294–1303. 10.1007/s10826-019-01358-z

Abstract: Objective: The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the feasibility and initial efficacy of a large-group, time-limited Parent Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) adaptation for parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and externalizing behavior problems (EBP). Methods: Participants included parents of 37 preschoolers (Mage = 4.80, 87% Male, 73% Hispanic/Latino) with ASD and comorbid EBP. Parents reported on their positive and negative parenting practices and parenting stress at a pre-and-post treatment assessment as well as at a 6-month follow-up assessment. Positive and negative parenting skills were observed and coded during a parent-child interaction. Additionally, parents were objectively assessed on their knowledge of principles learned in treatment at pre-and-post-treatment. Results: The treatment was delivered with a high level of fidelity and was well received and attended by families. At post-treatment, parents reported improved parenting stress and parenting practices. Parents were also rated as engaging in more positive parenting skills and less negative parenting skills during play. Lastly, parents increased their knowledge of principles presented in treatment. Improvements in positive parenting practices were also maintained at a 6-month follow-up assessment. Conclusions: Findings highlight the initial efficacy and transdiagnostic nature of group PCIT for improving outcomes for children with ASD and comorbid EBP.


Keywords: Autism spectrum disorder; Behavioral parent training; Externalizing behavior problems; Parent Child Interaction Therapy; Parenting.

Article: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2019-09328-001

to

TOP

 

Child-directed interaction training for young children with autism spectrum disorders: Parent and child outcomes

Ginn, N. C., Clionsky, L. N., Eyberg, S. M., Warner-Metzger, C., & Abner, J. P. (2017). Child-directed interaction training for young children with autism spectrum disorders: Parent and child outcomes. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 46, 101-109.
https://doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2015.1015135

Abstract: This study examined the efficacy of the Child-Directed Interaction Training (CDIT) phase of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Thirty mother-child dyads with children ages 3-7 years with a diagnosis of ASD participated in this randomized controlled study. Following manualized CDIT, statistically significant and meaningful improvements in child disruptive behavior and social awareness as well as maternal distress associated with child disruptive behavior occurred. Across 8 sessions, mothers learned to provide positive attention to their children's appropriate social and play behaviors. Both child and parent changes were maintained at 6-week follow-up. A relatively brief, time-limited, and accessible intervention may be efficacious for improving child and parent behaviors in families of young children with ASD. By decreasing child disruptive behaviors, CDIT may also help to prepare children to benefit further from future interventions.


Keywords: PCIT; Clinical Disorders; Autism Spectrum Disorder. 

Article: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15374416.2015.1015135

to

TOP

 

Open-trial pilot of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder

Zlomke, K. R., Jeter, K., & Murphy, J. (2017). Open-trial pilot of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder. Child & Family Behavior Therapy, 39, 1-18.
https://doi.org/10.1080/07317107.2016.1267999

Abstract: In this pilot study, the effectiveness and feasibility of  Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) for decreasing   disruptive behavior was evaluated in 17 young children with  Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). PCIT is a behaviorally based  play therapy which targets the parent-child relationship  through live coaching of play interactions and the implementation  of consistent discipline techniques. Following an average of  19 sessions, disruptive behavior as measured by multiple  indices significantly decreased. Congruently, parents increased  positive parental following skills and decreased negative  parental leading skills across the course of treatment. In  addition, parents reported increased levels of child functional  communication and prosocial behavior. High levels of parent  acceptability of the intervention were also noted. Effect sizes  were medium to large across measured dependent variables,  including parent report and behavioral observations.  Implications for the clinical use of PCIT within an ASD  population and future research with controlled outcome studies  are discussed.


Keywords: PCIT; Clinical Disorders; Autism Spectrum Disorder; ASD; Disruptive Behavior; Manualized Intervention; Parenting Intervention; Play Therapy. 

Article: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07317107.2016.1267999

to

TOP

 

Examining the efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with children on the autism spectrum

Masse, J. J., McNeil, C. B., Wagner, S., & Quetsch, L. B. (2016). Examining the efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with children on the autism spectrum. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 25, 2508-2525.
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-016-0424-7

Abstract: Externalizing behaviors are a common component  of the clinical presentation of autism spectrum disorders.  Although traditionally used with typically-developing  children, parent–child interaction therapy (PCIT) is one  behaviorally-based parent training program that has  demonstrated success in increasing child compliance,  reducing problem behavior, and improving parent–child  communication. The study examined the efficacy of PCIT  as a treatment for children with autism spectrum disorders  by employing a single subject, non-concurrent multiple  baseline design across three subjects. Primary findings revealed increases in child compliance, reductions in child  disruptive behavior, and improved parenting skills across  participants. In addition, each caregiver reported high levels of satisfaction with the intervention. Results suggested that PCIT may be a treatment option for children on  the autism spectrum with co-occurring behavioral difficulties.  Although the non-concurrent nature of the multiple baseline design is a limitation, this study replicates and extends previous research investigating the efficacy of  PCIT with children with autism and their parents.

Article: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2016-22244-001

to

TOP

 

Using a modified Parent-Child Interaction Therapy to increase vocalizations in children with autism

Hansen, B., & Shillingburg, M. A. (2016). Using a modified Parent-Child Interaction Therapy to increase vocalizations in children with autism. Child & Family Behavior Therapy, 38, 318-330.
https://doi.org/10.1080/07317107.2016.1238692

Abstract: Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is a manualized behavioral intervention originally developed by Eyberg (1988) to address disruptive behaviors in young children. Although previous research findings support the contention that components of PCIT would positively impact communication, behavior, and adaptive skills (Howard, Sparkman, Cohen, Green, & Stanislaw, 2005; Lovaas, 1987; Remington et al., 2007) in children with developmental disabilities, few studies are shown in the literature. In a modified version of PCIT, caregivers completed two phases of intervention with their child diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). During the Child-Directed Interaction (CDI) phase, caregivers were taught to conduct mand training, follow-their child’s lead, provide attention for their child’s positive behaviors, and ignore their child’s negative behaviors. During the Parent-Directed Interaction (PDI) phase, caregivers were taught to give effective commands and follow through with demands. The goal of the current study was to determine whether children’s production of vocalizations increased after participation in a modified PCIT program. Data from two participants diagnosed with autism were included in the study. Outcomes of these two case studies show that both children displayed an increase in the total number of vocalizations emitted in the posttreatment observation relative to baseline. Additionally, caregivers of both participants displayed an increased number of positive behaviors in the posttreatment observation relative to baseline.

 

Keywords: PCIT; Clinical Disorders; Autism Spectrum Disorder; Language; General Outcomes Studies. 

Article: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07317107.2016.1238692

to

TOP

 

Combining Parent–Child Interaction Therapy and visual supports for the treatment of challenging behavior in a child with autism and intellectual disabilities and comorbid epilepsy

Armstrong, K., DeLoatche, K. J, Preece, K. K., & Agazzi, H. (2015). Combining Parent–Child Interaction Therapy and visual supports for the treatment of challenging behavior in a child with autism and intellectual disabilities and comorbid epilepsy. Clinical Case Studies, 14, 3-14.
https://doi.org/10.1177/1534650114531451

Abstract: About one in six children has one or more developmental disabilities, which include autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disabilities (ID). Individuals with both ASD and ID are at higher risk of epilepsy, and those with younger onset of seizures are at higher risk of both developmental and behavioral disorders. Young children presenting with developmental and behavioral challenges are often very difficult for caregivers to manage, and challenging behavior results in reduced learning opportunities. Finding effective and efficient interventions to address behavioral issues remains a clinical priority to improve overall outcomes for all children and especially those with developmental disabilities. This case study presents the treatment of a 5-year-old girl diagnosed with ASD, ID, and comorbid epilepsy using Parent–Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) combined with visual supports (VS). Findings from this case report documented (a) an improvement in behavioral functioning in home, school, and community settings; (b) evidence for the effectiveness of parent-mediated intervention; and (c) support for collaboration and care coordination to improve intervention outcomes.


Keywords: PCIT; Clinical Disorders; Autism Spectrum Disorder; intellectual disabilities; epilepsy. 

Article: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1534650114531451

to

TOP

 

Parent–Child Interaction Therapy and autism spectrum disorder: Adaptations with a child with severe developmental delays

Lesack, R., Bearss, K., Celano, M., & Sharp, W. G. (2014). Parent–Child Interaction Therapy and autism spectrum disorder: Adaptations with a child with severe developmental delays. Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology, 2, 68-82.
https://doi.org/10.1037/cpp0000047

Abstract: Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) frequently present with co-occurring problem behaviors (e.g., noncompliance, aggression), which increase the risk for exclusion from educational programming, social relationships, and community activities. Although behavioral intervention represents a frequently cited and promising approach for addressing challenging behaviors in ASD, there is a pressing need to expand the availability and dissemination of short-term, evidenced-based interventions to meet growing demand in the ASD community. Originally developed for typically developing children, Parent–Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) represents a well-supported, behaviorally based parent training program shown to hold potential benefit for children with ASD. Questions, however, remain regarding the application of PCIT among children with ASD and pronounced developmental delays. This case study describes the use of PCIT with a child with ASD who presents with limited receptive and expressive communication skills, as well as a history of aggression, tantrums, and noncompliance. Adaptations to the intervention included changes to both phases of the intervention (CDI and PDI). Results indicate that the intervention was associated with acquisition of parenting skills and reduced problem behaviors, suggesting PCIT with modifications may also hold benefit for children with ASD and severe developmental delays.


Keywords: PCIT; Clinical Disorders; Autism spectrum disorders; behavior problems; case study; parent training; Model Adaptation Studies. 

Article: https://doi.apa.org/doiLanding?doi=10.1037%2Fcpp0000047

to

TOP

 

The effectiveness of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for families of children on the autism spectrum

Solomon, M., Ono, M., Timmer, S., & Goodlin-Jones, B. (2008). The effectiveness of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for families of children on the autism spectrum. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 38, 1767-1776.

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-008-0567-5 

Abstract: We report the results of a pilot trial of an evidence-based treatment-Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT; Eyberg et al. Psychopharmacology Bulletin, 31(1), 83-91, 1995) for boys aged 5-12 with high functioning autism spectrum disorders and clinically significant behavioral problems. The study also included an investigation of the role of shared positive affect during the course of therapy on child and parent outcomes. The intervention group showed reductions in parent perceptions of child problem behaviors and child atypicality, as well as an increase in child adaptability. Shared positive affect in parent child dyads and parent positive affect increased between the initial and final phases of the therapy. Parent positive affect after the first phase was related to perceptions of improvement in problem behaviors and adaptive functioning.


Keywords: PCIT; Clinical disorders; Affect; Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity; Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders; Autistic Disorder; Child; Preschool; Depression; Family; Family Therapy; Humans; Male; Parent-Child Relations; Parents; Surveys; and Questionnaires. 

Article: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18401693

to

TOP

 

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy and high functioning autism: A conceptual overview

Masse, J. J., McNeil, C. B., Wagner, S. M., & Chorney, D. B. (2008). Parent-Child Interaction Therapy and high functioning autism: A conceptual overview. Journal of Early and Intensive Behavior Intervention, 4, 714-735.
https://doi.org/10.1037/h0100402

Abstract: Externalizing behaviors are a common component of the clinical presentation of Autism Spectrum Disorders and are typically the initial focus of treatment for children within this population. This article examines the appropriateness of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) as a first-line, gateway treatment for preschoolers with High Functioning Autism who demonstrate co-occurring difficulties with aggressive and noncompliant behavior. Although PCIT has shown initial success in treating children with High Functioning Autism, much of the knowledge is based on clinical case studies thus warranting further empirical research before conclusions can be drawn.


Keywords: PCIT; Clinical Disorders; Autism Spectrum Disorder; High Functioning Autism; Externalizing Behaviors.

Article: https://doi.apa.org/fulltext/2014-52744-007.html

to

TOP

 

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy Adapted for Preschoolers with Callous-Unemotional Traits: An Open Trial Pilot Study.

Kimonis, E. R., Fleming, G., Briggs, N., Brouwer-French, L., Frick, P. J., Hawes, D. J., Bagner, D. M., Thomas, R., & Dadds, M. (2019). Parent-Child Interaction Therapy Adapted for Preschoolers with Callous-Unemotional Traits: An Open Trial Pilot Study. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 48, S347–S361. 10.1080/15374416.2018.1479966

Abstract: Children with co-occurring conduct problems and callous-unemotional (CU) traits show a distinct pattern of early starting, chronic, and aggressive antisocial behaviors that are resistant to traditional parent-training interventions. The aim of this study was to examine in an open trial the acceptability and initial outcomes of a novel adaptation of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy, called PCIT-CU, designed to target 3 distinct deficits of children with CU traits. Twenty-three Australian families with a 3- to 6-year-old (Mage = 4.5 years, SD = .92) childwith clinically significant conduct problems and CU traits participated in the 21-week intervention and 5 assessments measuring child conduct problems, CU traits, and empathy at a university-based research clinic. Treatment retention was high (74%), and parents reported a high level of satisfactionwith the program. Results of linear mixed models indicated that the intervention produced decreases in child conduct problems and CU traits, and increases in empathy, with "medium" to "huge" effect sizes (ds = 0.7-2.0) thatmaintained at a 3-month follow-up. By 3 months posttreatment, 75% of treatment completers no longer showed clinically significant conduct problems relative to 25% of dropouts. Findings provide preliminary support for using the targeted PCIT-CU adaptation to treat young children with conduct problems and co-occurring CU traits.


Keywords: Preschool children; Delinquent behavior; Pilot projects; Aggression (Psychology); Therapeutics.

Article: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29979887/

to

TOP

 

Parent training outcomes among young children with callous-unemotional conduct problems with or at risk for developmental delay

Kimonis, E. R., Bagner, D. M., Linares, D., Blake, C. A., & Rodríguez, G. M. (2014). Parent training outcomes among young children with callous-unemotional conduct problems with or at risk for developmental delay. Journal of Child & Family Studies, 23, 437-448.

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-013-9756-8

Abstract: School-aged children with conduct problems and high levels of callous-unemotional (i.e., lack of empathy, guilt, and lack of caring behaviors) traits (CP+CU) tend to yield less benefit from traditional interventions than do their low-CU counterparts, particularly with respect to CP outcomes. To date, little is known about treatment response among young children with CP+CU, particularly those with or at risk for developmental delay. Components of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), a parent training program effective at reducing CP in young children, have compelling theoretical support for addressing core deficits unique to children with CP+CU and have been used successfully with young children with developmental delay. Our first aim was to test the psychometric properties of a measure of CU traits in preschool children with and without developmental delay. Our second aim was to test whether CU traits predicted post-treatment CP after controlling for initial levels of CP. Participants were 63 families of young children (mean age = 3.87 years), with or at-risk for developmental delay, who presented with elevated CP and were treated in a hospital-based outpatient clinic. Results indicated that developmentally delayed children with high levels of CU traits, but not children at-risk for delay due to premature birth, showed significantly poorer CP outcomes following treatment with PCIT than did children scoring low on CU traits, even after controlling for initial CP severity. The implications of these findings with regard to treating and preventing severe disruptive behaviors among young children with CP +CU are discussed.


Keywords: PCIT; Clinical Disorder; Conduct Disorder; Callous-Unemotional Traits; Conduct Problems; Assessment; Parent Training; Psychopathy; Developmental Delay. 

Article: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24511217/

to

TOP

 

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: A dyadic intervention for the treatment of young children with conduct problems

Bell, S. K., & Eyberg, S. M. (2002). Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: A dyadic intervention for the treatment of young children with conduct problems. In L. VandeCreek, S. Knapp, & T. L. Jackson (Eds.). Innovations in clinical practice: A source book, Volume 20. (pp. 57-74). Sarasota, FL: Professional Resource Press. 

Abstract: This contribution describes Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) and demonstrates its utility in the treatment of preschool children with conduct problems. Although we focus on children with severe and persistent disruptive behavior disorders, PCIT is implemented clinically with parents and children whose relational dysfunction may involve a range of individual and family problems (e.g., personality disorders, medical or neurological impairments, adjustment disorders, physical abuse, cognitive deficits, or poverty). Severe conduct problems in young children are rarely attributable solely to individual factors; therefore, PCIT seeks to effect behavior change in both participants in the parent-child relationship during early childhood. Epidemiological research suggests that the early development of conduct problems is a predictor of later psychological disorders including delinquency and criminal behavior (Fischer et al., 1984; Wright et al., 1998). Therefore, effectively addressing these problems during early childhood has important implications for the child and for society.


Keywords: PCIT; General Outcome Studies; Conduct.

to

TOP

 

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: An effective treatment for young children with conduct problems

Capage, L. C., Foote, R., McNeil, C. B., & Eyberg, S. M. (1998). Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: An effective treatment for young children with conduct problems. The Behavior Therapist, 21, 137-138. 

Keywords: PCIT; General Outcome Studies; Conduct. 

to

TOP

 

Oppositional defiant disorder and parent training

Eyberg, S. M., O'Brien, K. A., & Chase, R. M. (2006). Oppositional defiant disorder and parent training. In J. E. Fisher, & W. T. O'Donohue (Eds.). Practitioner's guide to evidence-based psychotherapy. (pp. 461-468). New York, NY: Springer. 

Keywords: PCIT; Book Chapters; Clinical Disorders; Oppositional Defiant Disorder; Parental Factors. 

to

TOP

 

Parenting disruptive preschoolers: Experiences of mothers and fathers

Calzada, E. J., Eyberg, S. M., Rich, B., & Querido, J. G. (2004). Parenting disruptive preschoolers: Experiences of mothers and fathers. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 32, 203-213. https://doi.org/10.1023/B:JACP.0000019771.43161.1c

Abstract: This study examined parental functioning and interactions with young children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD), with emphasis on differences between mothers and fathers in their responses to their child and in their unique contributions to the prediction of child disruptive behavior. Participants were 53 3- to 6- years olds with ODD who presented for treatment with two parents. Mothers reported more severe disruptive behavior and higher parenting stress than fathers. During parent-child interactions, mothers showed more responsiveness than fathers, even though children were more compliant during interactions with fathers. Regression analyses showed that fathers' parent-related stress was predictive of both mothers' and fathers' reports of disruptive child behavior; mothers' marital satisfaction was predictive of behavioral observations of child compliance with both mothers and fathers. This study revealed several important differences in the experiences of mothers verses fathers of disruptive children and indicates the importance of including the father in the child's assessment and treatment.


Keywords: PCIT; Parental Factors; Preschoolers; Disruptive Behavior; Fathers; Parenting Stress; Marital Satisfaction. 

Article: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1023%2FB%3AJACP.0000019771.43161.1c

to

TOP

 

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for oppositional children