Research on PCIT Assessments

 

Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI) Articles

Examination of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory discrepancy hypothesis (abstract)

Butler, A. M., Brestan, E. V., & Eyberg, S. M. (2008)

Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI): Norwegian norms to identify conduct problems in children (abstract)

Reedtz, C., Bertelsen, B., Lurie, J., Handegård, B. H., Clifford, G. & Mørch, W. T. (2008)

Factor structure and discriminative validity of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory with young children (abstract)

Weis, R., Lovejoy, M. C., & Lundahl, B. W. (2005)

Accuracy of assessment: The discriminative and predictive power of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (abstract)

Rich, B.A., & Eyberg, S.M. (2001)

Interparent agreement on the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (abstract)

Eisenstadt, T. H., McElreath, L. H., Eyberg, S. M., & McNeil, C. B. (1994)

Parent and teacher behavior inventories for the assessment of conduct problem behaviors in children (abstract)

Eyberg, S. (1992)

Concurrent validity of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (abstract)

Boggs, S. R., Eyberg, S., & Reynolds, L. A. (1990)

Conduct problem behavior: Standardization of a behavioral rating scale with adolescents (abstract)

Eyberg, S.M., & Robinson, E.A. (1983)

The standardization of an inventory of child conduct problem behaviors (abstract)

Robinson, E.A., Eyberg, S.M., & Ross, A.W. (1980)

Assessment of child behavior problems: The validation of a new inventory (abstract)

Eyberg, S.M., & Ross, A.W. (1978)

Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction

Coding System (DPICS) Articles

 
Optimal or typical performance? The impact of instructional set on the behavioral assessment of parent-child interactions (abstract)

Niec, L. N., Shanley, J. R., Barnett, M. L., Baker, S. E., & Solomon, D. T. (2015) 

Screening for behavioral disorders with the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System: Sensitivity, specificity, and core discriminative components (abstract)

Bjorseth, A., McNeil, C. B., & Wichstrom, L. (2015)

The standardization of an inventory of child conduct problem behaviors (abstract)

Funderburk, B., Chaffin, M., Bard, E., Shanley, J., Bard, D., & Berliner, L. (2015)

Analyzing the utility of Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System (DPICS) warm-up segments (abstract)

Thornberry, T. S., Jr. (2011)

Measuring change during behavioral parent training using the Parent Instruction-Giving Game with Youngsters (PIGGY): A clinical replication (abstract)

Hupp, S. D. A., Reitman, D., Everett, G. E., Allen, K. D., & Kelley, M. L. (2011)

The contribution of the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction System (DPICS) warm-up segments in assessing parent-child interactions (abstract)

Shanley, J. R., & Niec, L. N. (2011)

Evidence-based school behavior assessment of externalizing behavior in young children (abstract)

Bagner, D. M., Boggs, S. R., & Eyberg, S. M. (2010)

Psychometric considerations (abstract)

Bagner, D. M., Harwood, M., & Eyberg, S. M. (2006)

Assessing the verbal behavior of conduct problem children during mother-child interactions: A preliminary investigation (abstract)

Forster, A. A., Eyberg, S. M., & Burns, G. L. (1990)

The Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System: Standardization and validation (abstract)

Robinson, E. A., & Eyberg, S. M. (1981)

Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory Articles

 

Examination of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory discrepancy hypothesis 

Butler, A. M., Brestan, E. V., & Eyberg, S. M. (2008). Examination of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory discrepancy hypothesis. Child & Family Behavior Therapy, 30,  252-257. https://doi.org/10.1080/07317100802275637

Abstract: This study examined the Eyberg Child behavior Inventory (ECBI) discrepancy hypothesis, which asserts that a discrepancy in score elevations on the ECBI Intensity and Problem Scales is related to problematic parenting styles. The Intensity Scale measures the frequency of child disruptive behavior, and the Problem Scale measures parent perception of their child's behavior as problematic. In a sample of 216 female caregivers of 3-to-7-year-old children, the magnitude of discrepancy between T scores on the two ECBI scales was found to predict parental tolerance for child misbehavior. A one-standard-deviation difference in ECBI T scores identified (a) parents intolerant of their child's misbehavior when the Problem score was highest and (b) overly permissive parents when the Intensity score was highest.


Keywords: PCIT, Measures, Discrepancy, Hypothesis, Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory, parent tolerance. 

Article: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07317100802275637

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Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI): Norwegian norms to identify conduct problems in children

Reedtz, C., Bertelsen, B., Lurie, J., Handegård, B. H., Clifford, G. & Mørch, W. T. (2008). Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI): Norwegian norms to identify conduct problems in children. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 49, 31-38. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9450.2007.00621.x

Abstract: This article presents the first Norwegian standardization of an assessment tool specifically designed to measure childhood conduct problems. Norwegian norms for the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI) based on data obtained from a random population sample (N= 4063) of children in the age range of 4 to 12 years are presented. The sample was drawn from rural and urban areas within three Norwegian town districts. Clinical and research advantages of having a properly standardized assessment tool for this specific subclass of childhood psychiatric problems in Norway are discussed.

Keywords: PCIT, International & Cultural Research, Child, Conduct Disorder, Norway, Reference Values, Surveys and Questionnaires, standardization, Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory, & problem behaviors.

Article: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18190400/

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Factor structure and discriminative validity of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory with young children

Weis, R., Lovejoy, M. C., & Lundahl, B. W. (2005). Factor structure and discriminative validity of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory with young children. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 27, 269-278. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10862-005-2407-7

Abstract: This study presents the standardization data for a brief behavioral inventory of child conduct problem behaviors. The 36 item Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI) was completed by the parents of 512 children (56% boys) ages 2 to 12. The psychometric characteristics of ECBI indicated that it is a reliable (.86 to .98) and valid instrument whose normally distributed scale is sensitive to a broad range of behavioral variability on the conduct problem dimension. Boys were reported to evidence more conduct problems than girls (p < .001; and mothers consistently reported more problem behaviors than fathers (p < .001). The relative consistency of ECBI scores across ages suggested that a conduct disorder is independent of stages in the child's development. It was suggested that conduct problem behavior is a manifestation of the interaction between the parent and child. The ECBI provides a psycho‐metrically sound parent‐report instrument to be used as an adjunct to observational methods in the treatment and study of conduct problem behaviors.
 

Keywords: PCIT, Measures, Conduct problems, ECBI, & Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory. 

 

Article: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10862-005-2407-7

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Accuracy of assessment: The discriminative and predictive power of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory

Rich, B.A., & Eyberg, S.M. (2001). Accuracy of assessment: The discriminative and predictive power of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory. Ambulatory Child Health, 7, 249-257. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1467-0658.2001.00141.x

Abstract: The discriminative and predictive power of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI) was assessed using revised clinical cut-off scores. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive power were calculated to evaluate the effectiveness of the revised score in screening children for treatment of disruptive behavior problems. Sample Participants were drawn from archival samples of 196 children aged 3–6 whose mothers had completed an ECBI. The disruptive behavior group (n = 98) consisted of children referred for psychological treatment who met diagnostic criteria for Oppositional Defiant Disorder or Conduct Disorder. The non-diagnosed group (n = 98) consisted of children visiting pediatric clinics whose mothers did not check the box on their demographic information questionnaire endorsing the presence of behavior problems. Design Children in the non-diagnosed group were selected to match the disruptive behavior group on socio-economic status, age, and sex. The mothers' scores on the ECBI Intensity Scale were used to calculate the sensitivity and specificity, positive and negative predictive power, and kappa of the ECBI. Results The ECBI Intensity Scale correctly classified 91% of the children, with 96% of the diagnosed children correctly classified and 87% of the non-diagnosed children correctly classified. Implications for practice This study further validates the ECBI for use as a screening measure for children in pediatric settings who require further evaluation or treatment for disruptive behavior problems.

Keywords: PCIT, Measures, ECBI, treatment, disruptive behavior, group, Clinical Disorders - Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Conduct Disorder, preschoolers, & screening. 

Article: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1046/j.1467-0658.2001.00141.x

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Interparent agreement on the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory

Eisenstadt, T. H., McElreath, L. H., Eyberg, S. M., & McNeil, C. B. (1994). Interparent agreement on the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory. Child & Family Behavior Therapy, 16, 21-27. https://doi.org/10.1300/J019v16n01_02

Abstract: This study investigated interparent agreement of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory for 44 clinic-referred families. Moderate to strong associations between maternal and paternal reports were found for both the Intensity and Problem Scales. Mothers rated their children's disruptive behavior as more frequent and problematic than did fathers. However, strong evidence for cross-informant reliability was obtained. Interparent reliability coefficients were comparable to those previously reported for other widely-used parent report measures of child behavior problems. Classification rates into conduct problem and non-conduct problem groups for maternal versus paternal reports were presented.
 

Keywords: PCIT, Parental Factors, ECBI

 

Article: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1300/J019v16n01_02?needAccess=true 

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Parent and teacher behavior inventories for the assessment of conduct problem behaviors in children.

Eyberg, S. (1992). Parent and teacher behavior inventories for the assessment of conduct problem behaviors in children. In L. VandeCreek, S. Knapp, & T. L. Jackson (Eds.), Innovations in clinical practice: A source book (volume 11, pp. 261-270). Sarasota, FL: Professional Resource Press.

Abstract: The behavior inventories described here are useful in the assessment of disruptive behaviors in children ages 2 through 16 that occur in the home and in school. The Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory on page 267 (ECBI; Eyberg, 1974) is designed for completion by parents, and the Sutter-Eyberg Student Behavior Inventory on page 268 (SESBI; Sutter & Eyberg, 1984) is designed for completion by teachers. Identical in format, each instrument assesses behaviors on two scales: an Intensity Scale, which indicates how often the behaviors currently occur, and a Problem Scale, which identifies the specific behaviors that are currently problems for the parent or teacher. The Intensity Scale provides a frequency-of-occurrence rating for each item, ranging from Never (1) to Always (7), and the item ratings are summed to yield and intensity score with a potential ranger from 36 to 252. The Problem Scale provides a "YES-NO" problem identification rating for each item, and the sum of yes responses yields a problem score with a potential range for 0 to 36.

Keywords: PCIT, TCIT, Measures, Disruptive Behaviors, Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory, Stutter-Eyberg Student Behavior, Mother Reports, & Intensity Scales.

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Concurrent validity of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory

Boggs, S.R., Eyberg, S., & Reynolds, L. A. (1990). Concurrent validity of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory. Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, 19(1), 75-78. https://doi.org/10.1207/s15374424jccp1901_9

Abstract: Examined the concurrent validity of the Problem and Intensity scales of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI), using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) as the criterion measure. Ss were 159 children (aged 4–16 yrs) referred for psychological evaluation between 1985 and 1988. ECBI Problem and Intensity scales were correlated with both the Internalizing and Externalizing scales of the CBCL, but were significantly more highly correlated with the Externalizing scale. Results support the validity of the ECBI as a concise measure of childhood conduct-problem behaviors.

Keywords: ECBI, Child Behavior Checklist

Article: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/1990-21399-001

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Conduct problem behavior: Standardization of a behavioral rating scale with adolescents

Eyberg, S.M., & Robinson, E.A. (1983). Conduct problem behavior: Standardization of a behavioral rating scale with adolescents. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 12, 347-354. https://doi.org/10.1080/15374418309533155

Abstract: This paper presents adolescent standardization data for a brief behavioral inventory of conduct problem behaviors. The 36‐item Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI) was completed by parents of 13 through 16 year olds from samples of conduct‐problem and non‐conduct‐problem adolescents. Results indicate the ECBI is a reliable instrument for use with adolescents. Factor analysis suggests the ECBI is a unidimensional measure of the conduct problem construct. Preliminary validation data suggest the usefulness of the ECBI in discriminating between normal and conduct‐problem adolescents. Analyses show no differences due to age or sex of the adolescent or differences due to the sex of the parent completing the inventory, and no differences between high/and low‐socioeconomic groups. Results from the normative samples provide data on the non‐conduct‐problem adolescent as a guideline in defining reasonable therapeutic goals. The ECBI has previously been shown to provide a psychometrically sound instrument for use with children, and the present results extend, these findings to adolescents, suggesting the ECBI can be a valuable adjunct to self‐report, projective, and observational techniques in the multimethod assessment of conduct‐problem adolescents.

 

Keywords: PCIT, ECBI, Eyberg, conduct, problem behavior, adolescents, measures, & assessment. 

Article: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15374418309533155

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The standardization of an inventory of child conduct problem behaviors

Robinson, E.A., Eyberg, S.M., & Ross, A.W. (1980). The standardization of an inventory of child conduct problem behaviors. Journal of clinical child psychology, 9, 22-28. https://doi.org/10.1080/15374418009532938

Abstract: This study presents the standardization data for a brief behavioral inventory of child conduct problem behaviors. The 36 item Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI) was completed by the parents of 512 children (56% boys) ages 2 to 12. The psychometric characteristics of ECBI indicated that it is a reliable (.86 to .98) and valid instrument whose normally distributed scale is sensitive to a broad range of behavioral variability on the conduct problem dimension. Boys were reported to evidence more conduct problems than girls (p < .001; and mothers consistently reported more problem behaviors than fathers (p < .001). The relative consistency of ECBI scores across ages suggested that a conduct disorder is independent of stages in the child's development. It was suggested that conduct problem behavior is a manifestation of the interaction between the parent and child. The ECBI provides a psycho‐metrically sound parent‐report instrument to be used as an adjunct to observational methods in the treatment and study of conduct problem behaviors.
 

Keywords: PCIT, Measures, Conduct problems, ECBI, & Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory. 

 

Article: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/247521338_The_standardization_of_an_inventory_of_child_conduct_problem_behaviors

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Assessment of child behavior problems: The validation of a new inventory

Eyberg, S.M., & Ross, A.W. (1978). Assessment of child behavior problems: The validation of a new inventory. Journal of clinical child psychology, 7, 113-116. https://doi.org/10.1080/15374417809532835

Abstract: This paper presents initial validation data for a behavioral inventory of child conduct problems. The 36‐item Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI) was completed by mothers of two‐ to seven‐year‐old children from several samples of problem and non‐problem behavior children. Results from this study indicated the usefulness of the ECBI in discriminating between problem and non‐problem children, for purposes of evaluation; provided data on the non‐problem child as a guideline in defining reasonable therapeutic goals; and demonstrated the ability of the ECBI to reflect the change following treatment intervention.

 

Keywords: PCIT, Measures, General Outcome Studies, Behavioral assessment of children, Behavior disorders in children, & Child psychology. 

 

Article: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/247521545_Assessment_of_child_behavior_problems_The_validation_of_a_new_inventory

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Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction

Coding System (DPICS) Articles

Optimal or typical performance? The impact of instructional set on the behavioral assessment of parent-child interactions

Niec, L. N., Shanley, J. R., Barnett, M. L., Baker, S. E., & Solomon, D. T. (2015). Optimal or typical performance? The impact of instructional set on the behavioral assessment of parent-child interactions. Child & Family Behavior Therapy, 37, 105-113. https://doi.org/10.1080/07317107.2015.1035981

Abstract: The behavioral assessment of parent-child interactions is an important component of treatment planning and evaluation in many evidence-based parent training programs. However, numerous factors unrelated to the parent-child interaction may add error to the assessment. This study investigated the impact of task instructions on parents’ behaviors during the analogue parent child interaction observation, the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System (DPICS). Forty-eight mother-child dyads were randomly assigned to one of two conditions that differed on level of specificity of instructions. Significant differences were observed between groups, with parents who received specific instructions using more praises during the DPICS tasks. Specific instructions may shift parents’ behaviors toward optimal, rather than typical, interaction patterns and should be considered in the context of the assessment goals.

Keywords: PCIT; Dyadic Parent Child Interaction Coding System; DPICS; Behavioral Observation; Instructional Set; Parent-Child Interaction Therapy.

Article:  https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07317107.2015.1035981

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Screening for behavioral disorders with the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System: Sensitivity, specificity, and core discriminative components

Bjorseth, A., McNeil, C. B., & Wichstrom, L. (2015). Screening for behavioral disorders with the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System: Sensitivity, specificity, and core discriminative components. Child and Family Behavior Therapy, 37, 20-37. https://doi.org/10.1080/07317107.2015.1000228

Abstract: We assessed the ability of the Dyadic Parent-Child Coding System to discriminate between Norwegian children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder and=or Conduct Disorder (n¼36) and community controls with no diagnosis (n¼122). All children were diagnosed by the Preschool Age Psychiatric Assessment. Results showed that a composite score of three negative parent codes— Negative Talk, Indirect Commands with No Opportunity for Compliance, and Direct Command with Compliance—as well as one child code, Command, evidenced excellent screening efficiency. Results are discussed in light of possible cultural differences in parent-child interaction and revisions of the coding system.


Keywords: PCIT; Dyadic Parent Child Interaction Coding System; Conduct Disorder; Observational Instruments; Oppositional Defiant Disorder; Parent-Child Interaction; Parenting. 


Article: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07317107.2015.1000228?journalCode=wcfb20

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The standardization of an inventory of child conduct problem behaviors

Robinson, E.A., Eyberg, S.M., & Ross, A.W. (1980). The standardization of an inventory of child conduct problem behaviors. Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, 9, 22-28. https://doi.org/10.1080/15374418009532938

Abstract: This study presents the standardization data for a brief behavioral inventory of child conduct problem behaviors. The 36 item Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI) was completed by the parents of 512 children (56% boys) ages 2 to 12. The psychometric characteristics of ECBI indicated that it is a reliable (.86 to .98) and valid instrument whose normally distributed scale is sensitive to a broad range of behavioral variability on the conduct problem dimension. Boys were reported to evidence more conduct problems than girls (p < .001; and mothers consistently reported more problem behaviors than fathers (p < .001). The relative consistency of ECBI scores across ages suggested that a conduct disorder is independent of stages in the child's development. It was suggested that conduct problem behavior is a manifestation of the interaction between the parent and child. The ECBI provides a psycho‐metrically sound parent‐report instrument to be used as an adjunct to observational methods in the treatment and study of conduct problem behaviors.

Keywords: PCIT, Measures, Conduct problems, ECBI, Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory

Article: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/247521338_The_standardization_of_an_inventory_of_child_conduct_problem_behaviors

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Analyzing the utility of Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System (DPICS) warm-up segments

Thornberry, T. S., Jr. (2011). Analyzing the utility of Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System (DPICS) warm-up segments. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 33, 187-195. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10862-011-9229-6

Abstract: Analogue behavioral observations are an important component of multimodal, multi-informant assessments. One observation system developed specifically for use with Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), an empirically-supported treatment for families of children with conduct problems, is the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System, now in its third edition (DPICS-III). Although the DPICS has undergone several revisions and is backed by a substantial knowledge base, more research is needed to bolster its utility. One topic in need of empirical investigation relates to the usefulness of the warm-up (WU) segments integrated throughout the structured DPICS observation. Although these segments were initially introduced to improve the representativeness of observational data collected in subsequent segments, this purported benefit has not been empirically investigated. This study analyzed the contribution of including WU segments in DPICS observations by comparing mean parent and child behavioral composites of frequency counts obtained from pre- and post-treatment DPICS WU and typically-coded (TC) segments. No significant differences were found between WU and TC segments at pre- or post-treatment observations. The implications of these findings are discussed. This study is limited by its use of a small, archival sample and low base rates for certain child behaviors. Future studies should focus on establishing test-retest reliability of the DPICS and developing training aids to facilitate the dissemination of the DPICS and PCIT into community settings.

Keywords: PCIT; Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System; DPICS; Behavioral Parent Training;       Analogue Behavioral Observation; Clinical Utility; Parental Factors.​

Article: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10862-011-9229-6

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Measuring change during behavioral parent training using the Parent Instruction-Giving Game with Youngsters (PIGGY): A clinical replication

Hupp, S. D. A., Reitman, D., Everett, G. E., Allen, K. D., & Kelley, M. L. (2011). Measuring change during behavioral parent training using the Parent Instruction-Giving Game with Youngsters (PIGGY): A clinical replication. Child & Family Behavior Therapy, 33, 289-298. https://doi.org/10.1080/07317107.2011.623091

Abstract: This is the second study to investigate the clinical use of the  Parent-Instruction Game with Youngsters (PIGGY) which is a  structured observation system derived from the Dyadic  Parent-Child Interaction Coding System II (DPICS-II; Eyberg, Bessmer,  Newcomb, Edwards, & Robinson, 1994) and the Behavior  Coding System (BCS; Forehand & McMahon, 1981). In a previous  study, the PIGGY demonstrated strong reliability and validity as  well as clinical utility (Hupp, Reitman, Forde, Shriver, & Kelley,  2008). The present study is a replication of the previous research on clinical utility by using the PIGGY to monitor changes in parent  and child behavior during and after behavioral parent training.

Keywords: PCIT; Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System; DPICS; Behavioral Assessment; Direct Observation; Oppositional defiant Disorder; Parent Training.

Article: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07317107.2011.623091

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The contribution of the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction System (DPICS) warm-up segments in assessing parent-child interactions

Shanley, J. R., & Niec, L. N. (2011). The contribution of the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction System (DPICS) warm-up segments in assessing parent-child interactions. Child & Family Behavior Therapy, 33, 248-263. https://doi.org/10.1080/07317107.2011.596009

Abstract: This study evaluated the inclusion of uncoded segments in the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System, an analogue observation of parent-child interactions. The relationships between warm-up and coded segments were assessed, as well as the segments' associations with parent ratings of parent and child behaviors. Sixty-nine non-referred parent-child dyads engaged in the observation. Parents completed measures about their parenting and children's behaviors. Significant differences were observed between the first situation's warm-up and coded segments, whereas minimal differences were found for the second situation. Findings suggest that the second warm-up segment may not be necessary for optimal assessment of parent-child interactions.

Keywords: PCIT; Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System; DPICS; Behavior Observation; Disruptive Behaviors; Parent Training; Parent-Child Interaction.

Article: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07317107.2011.596009

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Evidence-based school behavior assessment of externalizing behavior in young children

Bagner, D. M., Boggs, S. R., & Eyberg, S. M. (2010). Evidence-based school behavior assessment of externalizing behavior in young children. Education & Treatment of Children, 33, 65-83. https://doi.org/10.1353/etc.0.0084

Abstract: This study examined the psychometric properties of the Revised Edition of the School Observation Coding System (REDSOCS). Participants were 68 children ages 3 to 6 who completed parent-child interaction therapy for Oppositional Defiant Disorder as part of a larger efficacy trial. Interobserver reliability on REDSOCS categories was moderate to high, with percent agreement ranging from 47% to 90% (M = 67%) and Cohen's kappa coefficients ranging from .69 to .95 (M = .82). Convergent validity of the REDSOCS categories was supported by significant correlations with the Intensity Scale of the Sutter-Eyberg Student Behavior Inventory-Revised and related subscales of the Conners' Teacher Rating Scale-Revised: Long Version (CTRS-R: L). Divergent validity was indicated by nonsignificant correlations between REDSOCS categories and scales on the CTRS-R: L expected not to relate to disruptive classroom behavior. Treatment sensitivity was demonstrated for two of the three primary REDSOCS categories by significant pre to posttreatment changes. This study provides psychometric support for the designation of REDSOCS as an evidence-based assessment procedure for young children.

Keywords: PCIT; Clinical Disorders; Oppositional Defiant Disorder; Evidence-based Assessment; School Observation; Disruptive Behavior; Psychometrics; Preschool Children.

Article: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21687781

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Psychometric considerations

Bagner, D. M., Harwood, M., & Eyberg, S. M. (2006). Psychometric consideration. In M. Hersen (Ed.). Clinician's handbook of child behavioral assessment (pp. 63-79). San Diego, CA: Elsevier, Inc. 

Abstract: Psychometrics, or psychometry, is defined as the science of psychological assessment. It involves inspection of psychological instruments for their reliability and validity, the two core dimensions of psychometric evaluation. These psychometric properties indicate the extent to which an instrument approximates the true measurement of a construct of interest. This chapter examines the core dimensions of psychometric evaluation, reliability and validity, as they relate to child behavioral assessment. It discusses the strategies used to evaluate these psychometric properties, with examples from common child behavioral assessment instruments. The chapter also addresses the research and clinical issues related to test-retest reliability, interrater reliability, alternate-form reliability, internal consistency, and internal structure. Furthermore, it sheds light on the issues related to face validity, content validity, and criterion validity as well as the more specific types of validity within the general category of criterion validity (that is, discriminative, concurrent, and predictive validity). The chapter concludes with a discussion on research and clinical implications for psychometric issues in child behavioral assessment.

Keywords: PCIT; Book Chapter. 

Article: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780123430144500046?via%3Dihub

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Assessing the verbal behavior of conduct problem children during mother-child interactions: A preliminary investigation

Forster, A. A., Eyberg, S. M., & Burns, G. L. (1990). Assessing the verbal behavior of conduct problem children during mother-child interactions: A preliminary investigation. Child & Family Behavior Therapy, 12, 13-20.  https://doi.org/10.1300/J019v12n01_02

Abstract: In this study we compare the verbal behavior of 4 to 8-year-old conduct problem and normal children in interactions with their mothers in the Child-Directed Interaction phase of the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System (Eyberg & Robinson, 1983). It was predicted that conduct problem children would use less praise, ask fewer questions, make more critical statements, and give more commands during interactions with their mothers than normal children. Results support two of these four predictions, with conduct problem children using fewer questions and less praise. Implications for the assessment and treatment of conduct problems as well as how these verbal behaviors may develop from problem parent-child interactions are discussed.

Keywords: PCIT; 4-8 year olds; Child-Directed Interactions; Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction; Noncompliance Behaviors; Parental Factors.

Article: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J019v12n01_02

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The Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System: Standardization and validation

Robinson, E. A., & Eyberg, S. M. (1981). The Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System: Standardization and validation. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 49, 245-250. https://doi.org/10.1037//0022-006X.49.2.245

Abstract: The Dyadic Parent–Child Interaction Coding System (DPICS) is a comprehensive observational system for conduct problem families. Ss were 22 families referred for treatment of a conduct problem child (2–7 yrs of age) and 22 normal families observed in the laboratory in child-directed and parent-directed interactions. The conduct problem children displayed higher rates of noncompliance than normal children, and their parents were more critical and directive than normal parents. Both the referred child and its sibling exhibited behavior problems in conduct problem families, but the referred child was deviant in a greater variety of situations than the sibling. The DPICS was a reliable, clinically practical, research instrument that correctly classified 94% of families and predicted 61% of the variance in parent report of home behavior problems. The effectiveness of this brief procedure may be attributable to the structure of the clinic observation situations, which varied in degree of parental control.

Keywords: PCIT; Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System; DPICS; Child Behavior Disorders; Child; Preschool; Parent-Child Relations.

 

Article: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7217491

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